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The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be a multi-billion dollar enterprise. Live animals that are caught, like this box turtle, need immediate and long-term care at facilities like The Turtle Conservancy. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Kyne wearing her hyperbolic plane dress. Author photo by Fabian Di Corcia. Fabian Di Corcia/Fabian Di Corcia hide caption

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Fabian Di Corcia/Fabian Di Corcia

Drag queen Kyne Santos explores how math is 'beautiful' in new book 'Math in Drag'

Kyne Santos was a student at the University of Waterloo when she began her math and her drag careers. She compares her double life to Hannah Montana, doing math equations at school by day and drag at night. You may already know Kyne from TikTok, where she makes educational videos about math, science, history and drag. And now, in her new book Math in Drag, Kyne explores the connections between math and drag: How both can be creative, beautiful and most of all, fun.

Drag queen Kyne Santos explores how math is 'beautiful' in new book 'Math in Drag'

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Later this year, the FDA plans to decide whether MDMA can be used to treat PTSD Eva Almqvist/Getty Images hide caption

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A silky shark named Genie swam 17,000 miles, a record-breaking migration

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Like the gut, microbes are important for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. Getty Images/Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Getty Images/Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library

A microbiome transplant could help people with bacterial vaginosis

Humans rely on our symbiotic relationship with good microbes—in the gut, the skin and ... the vagina. Fatima Aysha Hussain studies what makes a healthy vaginal microbiome. She talks to host Emily Kwong about her long-term transplant study that asks the question: Can one vagina help another through a microbe donation?

A microbiome transplant could help people with bacterial vaginosis

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This Memorial Day, here's a smarter way to use sunscreen

Each year 84,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with melanoma. About 90% of these skin cancers are linked to the ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Sunscreen does protect the skin, but dermatologists have found six very common mistakes people make when it comes to using it. NPR science correspondent Allison Aubrey talks to host Regina G. Barber about the science behind sunscreen and how to avoid making these mistakes this summer. They also get into which sunscreens may be better than others.

This Memorial Day, here's a smarter way to use sunscreen

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Palestinians walk along Salah al-Din Road in Deir Al-Balah, in the central Gaza Strip. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Harlan Gough holds a recently collected tiger beetle on a tether. Lawrence Reeves hide caption

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Lawrence Reeves

To escape hungry bats, these flying beetles create an ultrasound 'illusion'

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Earlier this year, Virginia designated July as Uterine Fibroids Awareness Month. Tatyana Antusenok/Getty Images hide caption

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Tatyana Antusenok/Getty Images

Up to 80 percent of women will have a uterine fibroid by age 50

Fibroids are benign uterine tumors. So why does it matter that the majority of people with a uterus will have one before they are 50 years old? Physician Rachell Bervell, founder of the Black OBGYN Project, explains that when symptoms arise, they can be quite serious — from extreme menstrual bleeding to fertility problems. Plus, why they're very likely to affect you or a loved one.

Up to 80 percent of women will have a uterine fibroid by age 50

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The Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is seen in this undated image from NASA. Areas of the glacier may be undergoing "vigorous melting" from warm ocean water caused by climate change, researchers say. NASA via Reuters hide caption

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NASA via Reuters

Father and son are now caregiver and care recipient. Robert Turner, Sr. was cheerful even though his day started with being discharged from the hospital. Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR

Black men are a hidden segment of caregivers. It's stressful but rewarding, too

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A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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Sperm whale families talk a lot. Researchers are trying to decode what they're saying

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Ed Dwight poses for a portrait to promote the National Geographic documentary film "The Space Race" during the Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour, Thursday, in February. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
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Travis Kelce of the Kansas City Chiefs embraces Taylor Swift after defeating the San Francisco 49ers during this year's Super Bowl in Las Vegas. Swift, who flew in from Tokyo to attend the game, jokingly told him, "jet lag is a choice." Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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The Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, locked in a space shuttle's cargo bay, before the final repair work ever done. NASA/JSC hide caption

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NASA/JSC

Private mission to save the Hubble Space Telescope raises concerns, NASA emails show

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A burial team in Liberia awaits decontamination after performing "safe burials" for people who died of Ebola during the 2014-15 outbreak. Strains of the virus are harbored by bats and primates. A new study looks at how human activity affects the transmission of infectious diseases like Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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In college, Amylyx cofounders Josh Cohen and Justin Klee dreamed of finding a treatment for diseases like ALS. When their drug's promise did not pan out, they pulled it voluntarily from the market. Amylyx Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Amylyx Pharmaceuticals

Lots of drug companies talk about putting patients first — but this one actually did

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