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Camila Vargas-Restrepo/NPR

Zipcode Destiny: The Persistent Power Of Place And Education

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Chris and Nancy Brown embrace Monday while looking over the remains of their burned residence after the Camp Fire tore through the region in Paradise, Calif. Dozens of people have been killed in the latest fires to hit the state. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

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Humans would do better to accept many of the life forms that share our space, than to scrub them all away, says ecologist Rob Dunn. Basic Books hide caption

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Basic Books

Counting The Bugs And Bacteria, You're 'Never Home Alone' (And That's OK)

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Protestors holding pictures of people who died from use of paint removers, including Drew Wynne, protest outside a Portland, Maine, Lowe's store on May 10, 2018. They were trying to persuade the retailer to stop selling paint strippers containing methylene chloride. Ben McCanna/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben McCanna/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Retailers Plan To Clear Deadly Paint Removers From Shelves, As EPA Delays Ban

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Taking fish oil supplements to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer may not be effective, a new study suggests. Cathy Scola/Getty Images hide caption

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Cathy Scola/Getty Images

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results

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Nicole and Ben Veum, with their little boy, Adrian. Nicole was in recovery from opioid addiction when she gave birth to Adrian, and she worried the fentanyl in her epidural would lead to relapse, but it didn't. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

Childbirth In The Age Of Addiction: New Mom Worries About Maintaining Her Sobriety

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Mourners comfort each other Thursday during a vigil at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza for the victims of the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Another Mass Shooting? 'Compassion Fatigue' Is A Natural Reaction

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Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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The skull of a mosasaur, one segment of a full-scale reconstruction, is displayed in front of a mural painted by natural history artist Karen Carr, depicting the mosasaur's underwater environment. Madeleine Cook/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook/NPR

Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

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The oldest figurative painting, found in caves at the far eastern edge of the island of Borneo, depicts a wild cow with horns and dates to at least 40,000 years ago — thousands of years older than figurative paintings found in Europe. Luc-Henri Fage/Nature hide caption

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Luc-Henri Fage/Nature

Indonesian Caves Hold Oldest Figurative Painting Ever Found, Scientists Say

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Alba Nava uses an aspirator to gather virus-carrying whiteflies that have been feeding on tomato plants at the University of Florida. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Is The Pentagon Modifying Viruses To Save Crops — Or To Wage Biological Warfare?

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Sounds Like A Winner: What Voices Have To Do With Politics

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Tetris and other absorbing brain games can get you into a "flow" state that relieves stress. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Can't Stop Worrying? Try Tetris To Ease Your Mind

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