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In this Sept. 15, 2017, photo provided by the U.S. Army Alaska, soldiers from Alpha Company, 70th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, conduct unscheduled field maintenance under the Northern Lights on a squad vehicle in preparation for platoon external evaluations at Donnelly Training Area, near Fort Greely. Charles Bierwirth/AP hide caption

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Charles Bierwirth/AP

An operator of the mine railway that carries people in and out of the depths of the mine waits as workers disembark. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A Rising Demand for Coal Amidst War in Ukraine

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There are two known species of manta ray, the giant manta ray and the reef manta ray. Both populations are at-risk due to threats like fisheries and pollution. The IUCN lists the giant manta ray as endangered and the reef manta ray as vulnerable. Rachel T Graham/MarAlliance hide caption

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Rachel T Graham/MarAlliance

Ode To The Manta Ray

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A new rule from the Food and Drug Administration could allow some American adults to buy hearing aids without costly doctor's visits as soon as October. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Philosopher William MacAskill coined the term "longtermism" to convey the idea that humans have a moral responsibility to protect the future of humanity, prevent it from going extinct and create a better future for many generations to come. He outlines this concept in his new book, What We Owe the Future. Matt Crockett hide caption

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Matt Crockett

A COVID-19 vaccination center in London. The United Kingdom has become the first country to approve an omicron-specific booster shot. Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images

Latte art by Sam Spillman, winner of the 2019 United States Barista Championship. Sam Spillman hide caption

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Sam Spillman

How To Brew Amazing Coffee With Science

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Blacktail Deer Creek in Yellowstone National Park, seen here in a 2019 photo from the ecological study known as NEON, is one site where researchers have bubbled sulfur hexafluoride into the water. NEON hide caption

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NEON

Why scientists have pumped a potent greenhouse gas into streams on public lands

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Miss Jocelyn Bell, 1968. A photograph of Jocelyn Bell Burnell (born 1943) at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory at Cambridge University, taken for the Daily Herald newspaper in 1968. Daily Herald Archive/National Science & Media Museum/SSPL via Getty Images hide caption

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Daily Herald Archive/National Science & Media Museum/SSPL via Getty Images

The Radio Wave Mystery That Changed Astronomy

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Grape vines at Korbel vineyards are submerged under floodwater Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, near Guerneville, Calif. The Central Valley produces $17 billion worth of crops every year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

This photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, a carrier of Lyme disease. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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James Gathany/AP

Tick Check! The Tiny Bloodsuckers In Our Backyards

Short Wave is going outside every Friday this summer! In this second episode of our series on the National Parks System, we head to Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas. Among the trees and trails, researchers like Adela Oliva Chavez search for blacklegged ticks that could carry Lyme disease. She's looking for answers as to why tick-borne illnesses like Lyme disease are spreading in some parts of the country and not others. Today: What Adela's research tells us about ticks and the diseases they carry, and why she's dedicated her career to understanding what makes these little critters... tick.

Tick Check! The Tiny Bloodsuckers In Our Backyards

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The Inflation Reduction Act includes tax credits for residential solar and battery storage systems, along with other measures aimed at encouraging individuals to cut their carbon emissions. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

3 ways the Inflation Reduction Act would pay you to help fight climate change

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The wild ponies roam on South Ocean Beach at Assateague Island. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

A fossilized tooth may help solve the mystery of the Chincoteague ponies

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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A Russian serviceman patrols Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station on May 1. A series of exchanges in recent weeks has made conditions at the plant more dangerous. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

In this 30 second exposure, a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Perseid meteor shower, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, in Spruce Knob, West Virginia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls) NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls) hide caption

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NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Twinkle, Twinkle, Shooting Star

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This iamge provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a colorized transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox particles (orange) found within an infected cell (brown), cultured in the laboratory. NIAID via AP hide caption

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NIAID via AP

How Monkeypox Became A Public Health Emergency

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