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Charities are cancelling plans for fundraising events at President Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club. The cancellations come in the wake of his controversial comments about the events in Charlottesville. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Charities Pull Fundraisers Planned For Trump's Mar-A-Lago

For years, major charities have been holding fundraisers at Mar-a-Lago, the Palm Beach resort owned by President Trump. Now, in the wake of his comments on Charlottesville, many are turning away.

A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Gun-Carrying Protesters Create 'Tricky' Question For ACLU

"We don't feel we have to represent any group – including white supremacists – seeking to demonstrate with firearms," said the organization, which has long defended groups unpopular with its members.

Edward French, 71, was killed in San Francisco on July 11. One of the murder suspects was arrested two weeks before his death for gun possession and parole violations. The suspect was released based on a "public-safety assessment score" — a computer generated score that helps calculate whether a suspect is a flight risk or likely to return to court. Courtesy of Brian Higginbotham hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Higginbotham

Did A Bail Reform Algorithm Contribute To This San Francisco Man's Murder?

The July murder of photographer Ed French is raising questions and concerns about a pretrial risk assessment computer tool used by a growing number of county and city courts.

In Netflix's new show The Defenders, Jessica Jones and her superhero friends patrol the grim and gritty streets of a Hell's Kitchen that no longer exists in today's New York. Sarah Shatz/Netflix hide caption

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Sarah Shatz/Netflix

Marvel Comics Meet Reality On The Not-So-Mean Streets Of Hell's Kitchen

In Netflix's newest Marvel Universe show, The Defenders, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, Daredevil and Iron Fist patrol the dirty streets of a Hell's Kitchen that doesn't exist in today's New York City.

Marvel Comics Meet Reality On The Not-So-Mean Streets Of Hell's Kitchen

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro addresses the constituent assembly earlier this month. The group, which Maduro called for and which enjoys wide-ranging powers, granted itself the ability to pass laws. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's Pro-Maduro Assembly Seizes Congressional Powers

The move Friday marks a new milestone in President Nicolás Maduro's campaign to consolidate power, giving the lawmaking power of the opposition-packed congress to the legislative superbody he created.

According to a new study, among families in the middle socio-economic group the older September-born kids were 2.6% more likely to attend college, and 2.6% more likely to graduate from an elite university. Rawpixel Ltd/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Rawpixel Ltd/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Oldest Kids In Class Do Better, Even Through College

Starting kindergarten later could boost kids' grades and improve their odds of attending a top college. Being the youngest kid in class can hurt academic performance.

Bike patrol volunteers give directions to visitors at Acadia National Park. The Trump administration has rolled back an Obama-era policy put in place to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Trump Administration Reverses Bottled Water Ban In National Parks

The move reverses an Obama-era policy put in place to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. The aim was to cut back on plastic litter.

People gather around a single rose laid on the ground of Las Ramblas in Barcelona on Friday, observing one minute's silence for the victims of the terrorist attack. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

'Today Is A Day Of Mourning': Remembering The Victims Of Spain's Terror Attacks

An American has been confirmed as one of at least 14 people killed. More than 100 others were injured. In all, victims came from at least 34 nations. Here's a portrait of the lives lost.

Workers use a crane to lift the monument dedicated to former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney in Annapolis, Md., early Friday. The State House Trust voted Wednesday to remove the statue from its grounds. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Maryland State House Removes Statue Of Judge Who Wrote Dred Scott Decision

The infamous 1857 decision upheld slavery and declared that blacks were not citizens. Maryland's State House Trust voted Wednesday to remove the statue from its grounds, where it stood for 145 years.

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This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

NPR gets exclusive access to a lab in Portland, Ore., where scientists have begun editing the DNA in human embryos to try to prevent genetic diseases.

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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The guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald returns to port after colliding with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. MC1 Peter Burghart/U.S. Navy hide caption

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MC1 Peter Burghart/U.S. Navy

USS Fitzgerald Leaders Punished; Crew Is Praised After Collision With Cargo Ship

"Through their swift and in many cases heroic actions, members of the crew saved lives," the Navy said. It also blamed an avoidable crash on inadequate leadership and flawed teamwork.

Perceptions of discrimination track closely with voting against Trump, a survey found. Public Religion Research Institute, David Wasserman, Cook Political Report/Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Public Religion Research Institute, David Wasserman, Cook Political Report/Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

CHART: The Relationship Between Seeing Discrimination And Voting For Trump

There is an apparent correlation between a state's likelihood of having voted for Trump and whether residents think black, immigrant, and gay and lesbian communities face "a lot of discrimination."

The Israeli army facilitates the transfer of wounded Syrians to Israeli hospitals. Courtesy of the Israel Defense Forces hide caption

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Courtesy of the Israel Defense Forces

From Israel, Quiet Efforts Are Underway To Aid Civilians In Syria

The two countries have fought each other in the past and technically remain in a state of war. But both the Israeli military and private organizations are quietly delivering humanitarian aid.

From Israel, Quiet Efforts Are Underway To Aid Civilians In Syria

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