Students at Do Space learn to use a laser cutter during a crash course on how to design a key chain. Joy Carey/NET News hide caption

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All Tech Considered

In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All

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The privately funded, $7 million Do Space provides free access to computers, high-end software, 3-D printers, and laser cutters. It's a learning and play space, as well as an office for entrepreneurs.

In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All
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American actress Angelina Jolie speaks at a conference for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict, at the Dom Armije in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 2014. Ismail Duru/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Goats and Soda

Call Me Professor Jolie Pitt: The Buzz About Her New Job

Angelina Jolie was just appointed a professor for the coming semester at the London School of Economics. The development world is having a pro-con debate.

Majd Abdulghani kept a journal about a time in her life when she was torn between getting married or going to school. Courtesy of Madj Abdulghani hide caption

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Goats and Soda

Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?

For two years, Majd Abdulghani kept a journal during a crossroads in her life: Should she get married or keep studying? Or can she do both?

Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?
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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

Rio de Janeiro made a big push to provide security in its shantytowns. But some, which were touted as models, are again plagued by gang violence that has terrified residents.

As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas
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In 2005, Donald Trump announced the establishment of Trump University, a collection of online and in-person courses that promised to impart real estate investment skills. Lawsuits over the venture resulted in the release of confidential internal documents Tuesday. Thos Robinson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

'Trump University' Documents Put On Display Aggressive Sales Techniques

They say no cash is no reason to let potential students off the hook: "they will find the money." The documents, part of a lawsuit alleging fraud, recommend treating reporters with courtesy

'Trump University' Documents Put On Display Aggressive Sales Techniques
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Harambe, a western lowland gorilla, was fatally shot Saturday, May 28, 2016, to protect a 4-year-old boy who had entered its exhibit. Jeff McCurry/Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Animal Rights Group Calls For Federal Fines For Cincinnati Zoo

The complaint comes after the zoo killed a gorilla to protect a child who climbed into its enclosure. The group said the gorilla's enclosure was inadequate.

Malachi Kirby and Emayatzy Corinealdi in the new production of Roots. Steve Dietl hide caption

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Television

A Modern 'Roots' For An American Society Still 'Based On The Color Line'

The remake of the seminal TV miniseries begins on the History channel this week. Co-producer LeVar Burton says he recognized an opportunity to retell the story "to and for a new generation."

A Modern 'Roots' For An American Society Still 'Based On The Color Line'
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A barley shortage caused Venezuela's biggest beer producer, Polar, to stop production. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

Venezuela Is Running Out Of Beer Amid Severe Economic Crisis

The country's largest beer producer, Empresas Polar, halted operations because the government restricted access to imported barley. But the president has pinned the entire food crisis on Polar.

Venezuela Is Running Out Of Beer Amid Severe Economic Crisis
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The rock group Luna is reuniting, performing shows again and releasing a box set of its five albums. Stefano Giovannini hide caption

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Music

A Homecoming For Luna — And Its Devoted Following

Rolling Stone called the 1990s rock group "the best band you've never heard of," but Luna broke up in 2005. Now, its reunion is having a powerful impact on its loyal fans.

A Homecoming For Luna — And Its Devoted Following
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Immigrants from El Salvador, including one who says she is seven months pregnant, stand next to a U.S. Border Patrol truck after they turned themselves in to border agents on Dec. 7, 2015, near Rio Grande City, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S.

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum

Despite U.S. efforts to staunch the flow, numbers are approaching the crisis of two years ago. U.S. Border Patrol agents say the influx is diverting resources away from catching drug and human traffickers.

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum
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