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In 1989, after Iran's religious leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, issued a fatwa calling for the death of author Salman Rushdie, readings of his works were organized around the United States. At this one in San Francisco, novelist Alice Walker reads aloud from Rushdie's The Satanic Verses. Eric Risberg/Associated Press hide caption

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Eric Risberg/Associated Press

Threats to Salman Rushdie have sparked support and debate on free speech since 1989

Last week's attack has reignited debates over free speech, censorship and offensiveness that were already heated back in 1989, when an op-ed by a former president called Rushdie's book an "insult."

People shop at an Apple Store in Beijing on Sept. 28, 2021. Apple has disclosed serious security vulnerabilities for iPhones, iPads and Macs that could potentially allow attackers to take complete control of these devices. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Apple warns of security flaws in iPhones, iPads and Macs

Apple disclosed serious security vulnerabilities that could potentially allow attackers to take complete control of these devices. Experts advised users to install the latest software updates.

Jill Mallen gets her groceries at a food pantry because of soaring inflation. She says she's a "confused" voter - a registered Democrat who feels Republicans did a better job of managing the economy. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

How inflation is influencing politics in a bellwether Florida county

Voters in a key swing county in Florida are grappling with some of the highest inflation rates in the country. But it's not necessarily the deciding factor for some voters.

How inflation is influencing politics in a bellwether Florida county

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Deshaun Watson, #4 of the Cleveland Brown, looks to throw against the Jacksonville Jaguars during a football game at TIAA Bank Field on August 12, 2022 in Jacksonville, Florida. Mike Carlson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Carlson/Getty Images

Deshaun Watson is suspended for 11 games. How does the NFL make those decisions?

Behavior that is "illegal, violent, dangerous or irresponsible" is a violation of league policy. It applies to team owners, coaches, players, game officials and any other NFL employee.

Mango, of Mirrored Fatality, performs at the seventh annual Aklasan Festival in San Francisco on Aug. 5, 2022. Justin Katigbak for NPR hide caption

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Justin Katigbak for NPR

Aklasan Fest, the only Filipino punk festival in the U.S., celebrates a post-pandemic return

Aklasan means "rise up" in Tagalog. Event founder Rupert Estanisalo says he wanted to "create a space just for Filipino punks that looked like me and cared about the issues I cared about." Fifteen bands performed earlier this month.

Demi Lovato. Brandon Bowen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brandon Bowen/Courtesy of the artist

Demi Lovato on taking the power back through a heavy new album, 'HOLY F***'

"We'll just bleep this interview to death," says Morning Edition host Leila Fadel ahead of her conversation with Demi Lovato about a harder-edged new album, HOLY F***.

Demi Lovato on taking the power back through a heavy new album, 'HOLY F***'

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A federal judge ordered the Justice Department to provide a redacted copy of the affidavit used to justify the FBI search of former President Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence, saying he believed the affidavit should be partially released. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A judge creates a path for releasing a redacted affidavit from the FBI's Mar-a-Lago search

At a hearing, U.S. Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart said he's inclined to release in part the affidavit related to the search of former President Donald Trump's Florida home.

The mayor of Venice, Italy, mobilized a search for two people who used motorized surfboards to cruise down the picturesque city's canals. Now the pair are facing large fines. Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro / via Facebook hide caption

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Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro / via Facebook

Venice mayor calls out 'imbeciles' surfing Italian city's historic canals

Incensed by two people he saw as making a mockery of Venice, Mayor Luigi Brugnaro offered a free dinner to anyone who could help bring them to justice.

The beloved animated series Summer Camp Island is among the list of 36 titles HBO Max says it will no longer host on its streaming service. Cartoon Network Studios, Inc. hide caption

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Cartoon Network Studios, Inc.

HBO Max cuts dozens of titles in a cost-cutting move before a merger with Discovery+

HBO Max is pulling 36 titles from its streaming platform this week. The move isn't a kid-friendly one, with the service dumping several animated shows such as Infinity Train and Summer Camp Island.

A mural in memory of Mary Luten, 59, who died while saving others in the Waverly flood, sits on display at The Walls Art Park. The flood on Aug. 21, 2021, killed 20 people and damaged more than 700 homes. William DeShazer for NPR hide caption

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William DeShazer for NPR

In a flood-ravaged Tennessee town, uncertainty hangs over the recovery

WPLN News

It's been one year since a flood tore through Waverly, Tenn., and killed 20 people. There's been lots of effort to rebuild, but it's still unclear if the town will ever be the same.

In a flood-ravaged Tennessee town, uncertainty hangs over the recovery

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A sign scorched by the Caldor Fire greets travelers to Grizzly Flats, Calif., on Aug. 17, 2021. Andrew Nixon/CapRadio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon/CapRadio

National

A stalled U.S. Forest Service project could have protected a California town from destruction

CapRadio News

Two decades ago, the U.S. Forest Service warned that a wildfire mirroring the Caldor Fire's progression could easily wipe Grizzly Flats off the map. The Forest Service took steps to prevent such a catastrophe, but an investigation has found the plan fell short.

A sea of flowers lies at the fenced-off Soviet Victory Monument in Riga, Latvia, on Victory Day, May 9. The site fully named The Monument to the Liberators of Soviet Latvia and Riga from the German Fascist Invaders is a 260-foot concrete spire topped with a star that was built in 1985, in the waning years of Soviet rule in Latvia. Alexander Welscher/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Welscher/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Latvia plans to destroy a Soviet-era monument, riling its ethnic Russian minority

As Russia's war in Ukraine rages on, former Soviet republics like Latvia plan to destroy Soviet-era monuments. Some believe they should remain as tributes to the fight against Nazis in World War II.

Latvia plans to destroy a Soviet-era monument, riling its ethnic Russian minority

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Arizona state Rep. Mark Finchem speaks during an election rally in Richmond, Va., on Oct. 13, 2021. Finchem is now running for Arizona secretary of state, with former President Donald Trump's endorsement. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Election deniers are running to control voting. Here's how they've fared so far

Including Mark Finchem's win in Arizona, Republicans who deny the 2020 election results have now moved closer to overseeing the voting process in nearly a dozen states.

Election deniers are running to control voting. Here's how they've fared so far

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This June 23, 2011, file booking photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows James "Whitey" Bulger. Three men, including a Mafia hitman, have been charged in the killing of Bulger in a West Virginia prison. U.S. Marshals Service via AP, File hide caption

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U.S. Marshals Service via AP, File

A Mafia hitman is among three men charged in 'Whitey' Bulger's prison death

Three men, including a Mafia hitman, have been charged in the 2018 killing of notorious Boston crime boss James "Whitey" Bulger in a West Virginia prison, the Justice Department said.

In this Sept. 15, 2017 photo provided by the U.S. Army Alaska, soldiers from Alpha Company, 70th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, conduct unscheduled field maintenance under the Northern Lights on a squad vehicle in preparation for platoon external evaluations at Donnelly Training Area, near Fort Greely, Alaska. Charles Bierwirth/AP hide caption

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Charles Bierwirth/AP

The Northern Lights may move farther south into the mainland U.S. this week

The Northern Lights, known scientifically as auroras borealis, are triggered by geomagnetic activity from the sun. They typically occur closer to the North Pole, near Alaska and Canada.

Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Adaptation is one of more than 40 books being challenged in the Keller Independent School District. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

The Bible is among dozens of books removed from this Texas school district

The books under review were previously challenged and placed back on shelves, but now the Keller Independent School District wants them to undergo another review with new criteria.

Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska on the front cover of Vogue, photographed by Annie Leibovitz. Entitled "Portrait of Bravery," the spread and accompanying interview paint Zelenska as a woman stepping up to the challenge of her many roles in this war. Screenshot by NPR/Annie Leibovitz/Vogue hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Annie Leibovitz/Vogue

Ukraine's first lady posed for 'Vogue' and sparked discussion on how to #SitLikeAGirl

Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska was criticized for her pose on the cover of the famous fashion magazine. People are coming to her defense to challenge stereotypes about women.

Ukraine's first lady posed for 'Vogue' and sparked discussion on how to #SitLikeAGirl

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