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"People started screaming and shouting for them to let me go," says Vauhxx Booker, who says he was assaulted by a group of white men on July 4. Booker is seen here speaking at a community gathering against racism, where protesters demanded charges in his case. Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

'I Didn't Want To Be A Hashtag,' Says Black Man Who Feared Being Lynched In Indiana

"I hear a woman in the crowd yell out, 'Don't kill him.' And in that second, I realize that she's talking about me," Vauhxx Booker tells NPR.

'I Didn't Want To Be A Hashtag,' Says Black Man Who Feared Being Lynched In Indiana

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This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office shows (from left) Derek Chauvin,J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. Lane's attorney on Wednesday filed a motion to dismiss charges against him. AP hide caption

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AP

Transcripts Of Police Body Cams Show Floyd Pleaded 20 Times That He Couldn't Breathe

Filed as part of a motion to dismiss charges against one of the officers, the transcripts also appear to show an officer expressing concern about Floyd's well-being in the moments before his death.

Activists and relatives of Andres Guardado, who was shot and killed by an LA County sheriff's deputy in Gardena, called for justice last month. An independent autopsy has found Guardado was shot five times in the back. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

Family Autopsy Finds Andres Guardado Was Shot 5 Times In The Back

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has put a hold on the medical examiner's official autopsy report while it investigates the deputy-involved shooting. The family wants that report released.

Therrious Davis for NPR

'Me And White Supremacy' Helps You Do The Work Of Dismantling Racism

There's been a lot of talk about the work white people need to do to understand their role in racism. Layla Saad's book, Me and White Supremacy, helps readers do just that.

'Me And White Supremacy' Helps You Do The Work Of Dismantling Racism

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Black Students Matter demonstrators march en route to a rally at the Department of Education in Washington, D.C., on June 19. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Effective Anti-Racist Education Requires More Diverse Teachers, More Training

Travis Bristol, an assistant professor of education at the University of California at Berkeley, explains how teacher training and the presence of Black teachers can help reshape education.

Effective Anti-Racist Education Requires More Diverse Teachers, More Training

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President Trump participates in a White House event Tuesday on how to reopen schools safely. After insisting that the Republican National Convention should be in person with thousands of people, Trump said he is "flexible" about the format. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Trump, Long Adamant About Convention Despite Coronavirus, Admits It May Adapt

Trump's campaign has long wanted a sports arena packed to the rafters, but the president concedes in an interview that the worsening Florida outbreak may force those plans to shift.

The president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. Sally Goza, attends a meeting at the White House with President Trump, students, teachers and administrators about how to safely reopen schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Top Pediatrician Says States Shouldn't Force Schools To Reopen If Virus Is Surging

The American Academy of Pediatrics says children are better off in school but that the decision to reopen cannot ignore spiking infection rates.

Top Pediatrician Says States Shouldn't Force Schools To Reopen If Virus Is Surging

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Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., speaks during a House Judiciary Committee markup of the Justice in Policing Act of 2020 on Capitol Hill last month. Erin Scott/AP hide caption

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Erin Scott/AP

Ga. Congressman Calls For Investigation Of Black DA Leading Rayshard Brooks Case

Republican Rep. Doug Collins wants Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard investigated for "egregious abuse of power." Collins is running for a U.S. Senate seat in the fall.

Protest organizer DAntjuan Miller stands by the granite pedestal that remains of a monument to Confederate Navy Adm. Raphael Semmes in Mobile, Ala. "It's like a weight that's lifted off now that it's gone," he says. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

In Alabama, A City Debates How To Depict Its Past In The Present

When the city of Mobile, Ala., took down a statue of a Confederate naval officer it sparked a conversation about what the statue meant, and how the city's Confederate history should be portrayed.

In Alabama, A City Debates How To Depict Its Past In The Present

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The civil rights experts Facebook hired to review its policies faulted CEO Mark Zuckerberg's decision to prioritize free speech over other values. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Report Slams Facebook for 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

A two-year investigation concludes the social network's leaders made decisions that were "significant setbacks for civil rights."

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