Latest Newscast

President-elect Donald Trump's transition team circulated a survey to Department of Energy asking for names of employees who attended climate change conferences. Legal experts question the new administration's motives. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Trump Questionnaire Raises Concerns About Retaliation Against Energy Department Staff

A 74-point questionnaire sent to Energy Department asks for a list of employees who attended conferences on climate change. Legal experts worry if it's an effort to weed out agency environmentalists.

Alice Furlaud in Gstaad, Switzerland, with a Krugerrand gold piece. Courtesy of Alice Furlaud/Courtesy of Alice Furlaud hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Alice Furlaud/Courtesy of Alice Furlaud

Simon Says

Remembering NPR Essayist Alice Furlaud

Furlaud, who filed commentaries for NPR from Paris, was a graceful writer with an unfiltered view of the world, says NPR's Scott Simon. She died this week at the age of 87.

Remembering NPR Essayist Alice Furlaud

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505017723/505079181" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Adolf Hitler was born in 1889 in an upstairs apartment of this house in the Austrian town of Braunau am Inn, near the border with Germany. The sign on the sidewalk is for a library, which was a past use of the house. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Parallels - World News

For Austria, A Tough Choice On What To Do With Hitler's Birthplace

Austrian officials want to make sure "nothing would happen there ... that could support Nazi ideology in any way," says a government spokesman. But there's disagreement on how best to proceed.

For Austria, A Tough Choice On What To Do With Hitler's Birthplace

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504955078/505079212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., was part of a group of Coal State Democrats who wanted a longer extension of health benefits for coal miners in the stop-gap spending bill. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

Politics

No Government Shutdown: Senate Passes Funding Bill After Democrats Back Down

The bill, passed less than an hour before the deadline, will keep the federal government running until late April. Coal-state Democrats had been protesting provisions that affected miners.

The Sheikhan criminal court occupies a municipal office building north of Mosul. Cases are heard after long delays and defense attorneys have limited contact with their clients. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Kenyon/NPR

Parallels - World News

At A Makeshift Iraqi Court, Harsh Justice For Those Accused Of Aiding ISIS

Working in difficult circumstances, lawyers and judges do their best to administer justice. NPR was present at a trial of a man accused of repairing ISIS vehicles. He and relatives denied ISIS links.

At A Makeshift Iraqi Court, Harsh Justice For Those Accused Of Aiding ISIS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504977136/505079175" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wheeldon says the World's Fair was a natural fit for The Nutcracker's second act. Above, Christine Rocas and Fabrice Calmels. Cheryl Mann/Joffrey/Boneau/Bryan-Brown hide caption

toggle caption
Cheryl Mann/Joffrey/Boneau/Bryan-Brown

Dance

Taking A Crack At A New 'Nutcracker': This One's Set At The World's Fair

Choreographer Christopher Wheeldon has a fresh take on the classic Christmas tale. The $4 million Joffrey Ballet production premieres Saturday, and doesn't center around a wealthy Victorian family.

Taking A Crack At A New 'Nutcracker': This One's Set At The World's Fair

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504987078/505079218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The M-PESA agent who works in this shop is part of a vast network of small-time vendors. Screengrab by NPR/YouTube hide caption

toggle caption
Screengrab by NPR/YouTube

Goats and Soda

Dial M For Money: Can Mobile Banking Lift People Out Of Poverty?

We look at the remarkable findings from a new study of Kenya's M-PESA system, out in Science.

Dial M For Money: Can Mobile Banking Lift People Out Of Poverty?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504540392/505012193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Childish Gambino's new album, "Awaken, My Love!", is out now. Ibra Ake/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Ibra Ake/Courtesy of the artist

Music Reviews

Childish Gambino's New Album Is A Funky Left Turn

While he was working on Atlanta, Donald Glover was also gathering musicians for soul jam sessions. "Awaken, My Love!" is an album of '70s throwback sounds that feels thrillingly alive.

Childish Gambino's New Album Is A Funky Left Turn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504969213/505012175" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign in Washington, D.C., says "No matter where you are from, we're glad you're our neighbor," in three languages. It's a message that began at a church in Harrisonburg, Va., and is spreading to communities across the country. Courtesy of Drew Schneider hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Drew Schneider

The Two-Way - News Blog

A Message Of Tolerance And Welcome, Spreading From Yard To Yard

A church in Harrisonburg, Va., posted a simple message last year: "No matter where you are from, we're glad you're our neighbor," in three languages. Now the signs show up from D.C. to Detroit.

Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Shots - Health News

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

Monkeys weren't thought to have the right sort of vocal tracts to speak. But a study finds they can make many sounds common in human speech; it's just that their brains aren't "language ready."

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504890630/505079200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript