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California's farmers are pumping billions of tons of extra water from underground aquifers this year because of the drought. But new restrictions on such pumping are coming into force. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Satellites reveal the secrets of water-guzzling farms in California

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A screen image captured at Beijing Aerospace Control Center in Beijing on Saturday shows Chinese astronauts Ye Guangfu (from left), Zhai Zhigang and Wang Yaping waving after entering the Chinese space station. Tian Dingyu/Xinhua via AP hide caption

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Tian Dingyu/Xinhua via AP

Wang Yaping is one of three astronauts aboard the Shenzhou 13 spaceflight mission. She will be the first female astronaut to visit the latest Chinese space station, but she has the most space experience of the three. Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

A scenic view of a lake against the sky at night in British Columbia. Earlier this month, a resident of Golden, B.C., woke up to the sound of a crash and found that a meteorite had landed in her bed. Nadia Palici/Getty Images hide caption

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Nadia Palici/Getty Images

Canadian actor William Shatner, who became a cultural icon for his portrayal of Captain James T. Kirk in the Star Trek franchise, speaks at a convention in 2019. Michele Spatari/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Spatari/AFP via Getty Images

Space companies like Blue Origin are grabbing headlines with the promise of a new era of space tourism, mostly recently with the plan to send William Shatner to the edge of space. But unless you're lucky, space is still out of reach for most of the public. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

William Shatner is bound for space, but the rest of us will have to wait

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Cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (center), along with film director Klim Shipenko (right) and actor Yulia Peresild (left) pose for a photo ahead of the launch of the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft to the International Space Station from Kazakhstan's Baikonur Cosmodrome. Roscosmos Press Service//Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Roscosmos Press Service//Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

More than 50 years after the Star Trek franchise took TV audiences to alien worlds, William Shatner will visit space aboard a Blue Origin spacecraft. Shatner, right, is seen here with castmates Nichelle Nichols and Leonard Nimoy in a 1967 episode of the show. CBS via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS via Getty Images

NASA's new telescope bears the name of James Webb (center), an influential figure who was appointed by President John F. Kennedy to lead the space agency during the '60s. But some astronomers say discrimination against gay and lesbian government employees during his tenure should preclude him from having a telescope named in his honor. PhotoQuest/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoQuest/Getty Images

Shadowed by controversy, NASA won't rename its new space telescope

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The passengers of Inspiration4 in the Dragon capsule on their first day in space. They are Jared Isaacman (from left), Hayley Arceneaux, Chris Sembroski and Sian Proctor. SpaceX/AP hide caption

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SpaceX/AP

The 1st Black Woman To Pilot A Spacecraft Says Seeing Earth Was The Best Part

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The James Webb space telescope is an infrared telescope that will observe the early universe, between one million and a few billion years in age. NASA hide caption

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NASA

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

In December, NASA is scheduled to launch the huge $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is sometimes billed as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. NPR correspondents Rhitu Chatterjee and Nell Greenfieldboyce talk about this powerful new instrument and why building it took two decades.

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

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An artist's conception of the James Webb Space Telescope after it has unfolded in space. NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez hide caption

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NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

NASA's Got A New, Big Telescope. It Could Find Hints Of Life On Far-Flung Planets

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As inspiration for all trees preparing their autumnal hues, here's a beautiful red oak photographed in Berlin's Kreuzberg district on October 28, 2020. DAVID GANNON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DAVID GANNON/AFP via Getty Images

Two views of the Eagle Nebula's "Pillars of Creation," both taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The left shows the pillars in visible light; the right image was taken in infrared light. NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team hide caption

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NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team

NASA Is Launching A New Telescope That Could Offer Some Cosmic Eye Candy

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