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SpaceX founder Elon Musk during a T-Mobile and SpaceX joint event on August 25, 2022 in Boca Chica Beach, Texas. Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images

Texts released ahead of Twitter trial show Elon Musk assembling the deal

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Bed Bath & Beyond is working on yet another turnaround after a series of crises and missteps. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Will Bed Bath & Beyond sink like Sears or rise like Best Buy?

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This is the last complete image of Dimorphos taken by the DRACO imager on NASA's DART mission before the collision. It shows a patch of the asteroid about 100 feet across, captured from some 7 miles away and two seconds before impact. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

Social media company Meta's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. The Facebook parent company says it has removed a Russian network pushing a pro-Kremlin view of the war in Ukraine and a Chinese network targeting the U.S. midterm elections. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro greets supporters during a reelection campaign rally. Ahead of the first round of voting on Oct. 2, Bolsonaro has baselessly claimed that voting machines will be rigged against him, an echo of former U.S. President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election. Fred Magno/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Magno/Getty Images

Brazilians are about to vote. And they're dealing with familiar viral election lies

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This illustration shows the DART spacecraft approaching the two asteroids, Didymos and Dimorphos, with a small observing spacecraft nearby. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

The Library of Congress has acquired the life's work of radio producer Jim Metzner, who has spent decades traveling the world to capture rich soundscapes. While he's honored that they will be archived, he says he wants to make sure people actually listen to them. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

He spent decades recording soundscapes. Now they're going to the Library of Congress

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A worker performs maintenance on pipes used during brine extraction at a lithium mine in the Atacama Desert in Chile on Aug. 24. Paz Olivares Droguett for NPR hide caption

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Paz Olivares Droguett for NPR

In Chile's desert lie vast reserves of lithium — key for electric car batteries

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Protesters gather in front of the embassy of Iran in Berlin, on Tuesday after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in the custody of Iran's morality police. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

Chris Anderson interviews Stewart Brand (right) at TED2017. Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED

Stewart Brand reflects on a lifetime of staying "hungry and foolish"

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Two American Airlines Boeing 737s are shown at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in 2022. Hackers gained access to personal information of some customers and employees at American Airlines. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

A federal appeals court on Sept. 16 ruled in favor of a Texas law targeting major social media companies like Facebook and Twitter in a victory for Republicans who accuse the platforms of censoring conservative speech. AP hide caption

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AP

Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, seen here in 2018, and his network of websites have been banned from most major online and social media platforms but have still managed to bring in tens of millions of dollars in revenue. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Google's logo on a building on the company's Mountain View, Calif., campus in 2019. The company says it mistakenly sent a security engineer $250,000. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

After Queen Elizabeth II's death was announced, Wikipedia editors discussed which historical photo to use for her page. Wikipedia hide caption

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Wikipedia

Fastest 'was' in the West: Inside Wikipedia's race to cover the queen's death

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