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Commuters walk into a flooded subway station and disrupted service due to extremely heavy rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida on September 2, 2021. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Climate Change Means More Subway Floods; How Cities Are Adapting

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A civil suit filed by the Justice Department this week links exaggerated patient bills to tens of millions of dollars in overcharges by Medicare Advantage plans. A data analytics team facilitated the fraud, the lawsuit alleges. John Lund/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lund/Getty Images

Three former U.S. intelligence and military operatives have agreed to pay nearly $1.7 million to resolve criminal charges that they provided sophisticated hacking technology to the United Arab Emirates. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Bill Evans (center), the father of Billy Evans, Elizabeth Holmes' partner, accompanies Holmes into a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., for the start of her federal fraud trial. Nick Otto/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Otto/AFP via Getty Images

Apple released an emergency security software patch to fix a vulnerability that an internet watchdog group says allowed spyware from NSO Group to infect the iPhone of a Saudi activist without any user interaction. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP

A federal judge on Friday ordered Apple to loosen some of the rules on its App Store for how payments are processed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

What The Ruling In The Epic Games V. Apple Lawsuit Means For iPhone Users

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Some leading Democratic lawmakers are accusing Amazon of profiting off the spread of COVID-19 and vaccine misinformation. Michel Spingler/AP hide caption

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Michel Spingler/AP

Megan Alexandra Blankenbiller became sick before she was able to get the COVID-19 vaccine. She spent her final days in the hospital trying to help others avoid the same mistake. atasteofalex/TikTok hide caption

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atasteofalex/TikTok

Elizabeth Holmes (center) walks into the federal courthouse for her trial in San Jose, Calif., on Wednesday. Nic Coury/AP hide caption

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Nic Coury/AP

Prosecutors Call Theranos Ex-CEO Elizabeth Holmes A Liar And A Cheat As Trial Opens

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El Salvador's President Nayib Bukele (shown here at a news conference in May 2020) spearheaded efforts to make Bitcoin legal tender in his country. Yuri Cortez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Cortez/AFP via Getty Images

A screen capture of the website established by Texas Right to Life encouraging members of the public to submit "anonymous tips" about violators of the state's new restrictive abortion law. prolifewhistleblower.com hide caption

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prolifewhistleblower.com

Lyft said it would pay the legal fees for any of its drivers sued under Texas' new abortion law, which it called "incompatible" with company values. Uber quickly followed suit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Lyft And Uber Will Pay Drivers' Legal Fees If They're Sued Under Texas Abortion Law

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A person scans a QR Code on an Apple Watch to send a digital driver's license temporarily to another mobile phone last month in Salt Lake City. Utah is among eight states that eventually will let users add a license or state ID to Apple Wallet. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images