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Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez were recovery workers in Midland, Mich., after two dam collapses flooded the area. Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez hide caption

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Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez

'We Were Treated Worse Than Animals': Disaster Recovery Workers Confront COVID-19

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United Airlines says it plans to furlough up to 36,000 employees as the pandemic continues to batter the travel industry and much of the economy. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

'Devastated': As Layoffs Keep Coming, Hopes Fade That Jobs Will Return Quickly

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A women's movement activist holds a sign that reads in Portuguese "Genocide 60 thousand deaths, Bolsonaro out," during a protest against the government's handling of the pandemic earlier this month. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Starting July 23, the Census Bureau says door knockers will make in-person visits to households that have not yet filled out a 2020 census form in parts of Connecticut, Indiana, Kansas, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People sit in their cars and wait in line at a COVID19 testing center on July 7 in Austin, Texas. Some testing sites have hours long waits and some people arrive as early as sunrise. Patients have their temperature and pulse checked before being swabbed. Along with Florida and Arizona, coronavirus cases in Texas have spiked recently. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/Getty Images

3 Million Cases And Counting, U.S. Faces Same Problems From Beginning Of Pandemic

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United Airlines planes at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Company executives call the COVID-19 pandemic the worst crisis in the airline's history. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

The president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. Sally Goza, attends a meeting at the White House with President Trump, students, teachers and administrators about how to safely reopen schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Top Pediatrician Says States Shouldn't Force Schools To Reopen If Virus Is Surging

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Tiger Woods tees off at the 2018 Ryder Cup in France. The biennial tournament, previously scheduled for this year, has been postponed to 2021. Tom Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Jenkins/Getty Images

President Trump participates in a White House event Tuesday on how to reopen schools safely. After insisting that the Republican National Convention should be in person with thousands of people, Trump said he is "flexible" about the format. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Faced with a rat trapped in a restrainer, a free rat opens the trap's door to liberate the trapped animal (while stepping on its head — "very rat-ish behavior," says University of Chicago neurobiologist Peggy Mason). David Christopher/University of Chicago hide caption

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David Christopher/University of Chicago

To Come To The Rescue Or Not? Rats, Like People, Take Cues From Bystanders

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President Trump, seen here at a roundtable discussion at the White House on Tuesday, rebuked the CDC for its guidelines on reopening schools in a tweet Wednesday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A passerby wears a mask out of concern for the coronavirus while walking past an American flag displayed in Boston on Tuesday. The U.S. has now recorded more than 3 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Communication skills used to negotiate safe sex are also useful for setting boundaries while socializing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Above, circles drawn in the grass encourage social distancing at Dolores Park in San Francisco. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

This light micrograph from the brain of someone who died with Alzheimer's disease shows the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that are typical of the disease. A glitch that prevents healthy cell structures from transitioning from one phase to the next might contribute to the tangles, researchers say. Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source

Face coverings are seen on display in Los Angeles on July 2. California Gov. Gavin Newsom threatened this week to withhold up to $2.5 billion in aid to local police departments that refuse to enforce mask rules and other pandemic-related mandates. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

More States Require Masks In Public As COVID-19 Spreads, But Enforcement Lags

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Police in the southern New South Wales border city of Albury check cars crossing the state border from Victoria on July 7 as authorities close the border due to an outbreak of COVID-19 in Victoria. Australia ordered millions of people locked down to combat a surge in coronavirus cases, as nations across the world scrambled to stop the rampaging pandemic. William West/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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William West/AFP via Getty Images

Ideas For Reopening Schools; Evidence Of Airborne Spread

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses a news conference last month in Chelsea, Quebec. David Kawai/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Kawai/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Florida's education commissioner has ordered the state's schools to reopen for in-person instruction in the fall, subject to the advice and orders from health authorities. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Israeli security forces control access to a neighborhood that has been isolated following an increase in coronavirus cases in the southern coastal city of Ashdod last week. Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images