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Air passengers wearing practically full-body coveralls at the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International Airport in India. Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images

English coronavirus patients George Gilbert, 85, and his wife, Domneva Gilbert, 84, were part of a clinical trial that included Eli Lilly & Co.'s baricitinib. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Experimental Medicines For COVID-19 Could Help Someday, But Home Runs Not Guaranteed

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Rabbi Yehonatan Adouar teaches a shofar blowing course in Rambam Synagogue in Ramat Gan, Israel Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Wanted in Israel: More Shofar Blowers For Socially Distanced Jewish New Year

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Last Sunday in the park in Nairobi, life was seemingly back to normal in the middle of a pandemic — which didn't appear to hit the country as hard as expected. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR
Nicole Xu for NPR

How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap

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Demonstrators march through the streets of Rochester, N.Y., earlier this month protesting the death of Daniel Prude, apparently stopped breathing as police were restraining him in March. Adrian Kraus/AP hide caption

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Adrian Kraus/AP

A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Larry Yarbroff visits his wife Mary at Chaparral House in Berkeley, Calif. in July. California health authorities had allowed some visits to resume, and now federal regulators are doing the same, with measures to try to block the spread of the coronavirus. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced on Thursday that certain sectors in most of the state can expand their occupancy limits starting Monday. He also said that hospitals in those regions can now resume elective procedures and that eligible long-term care facilities can resume limited visitation next week. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

The U.S. Capitol, seen here on April 13, remains closed to public tours and open only to members, staff, press and official business visitors. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Massachusetts parents sent their child to Attleboro High School despite knowing the teenager was infected with the coronavirus. Above, a coronavirus test is performed at Boston University in July. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP
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About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

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A person on a bike rides by a sign in New York City urging people to stay home in May. As the pandemic drags on, some workers are facing tough choices — balancing potential risks of unwittingly spreading the disease against the possibility of losing pay during a quarantine. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

As Pandemic Stretches On, Revealing Possible Exposure Can Be Costly To Workers

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A health worker wearing protective gear collects a swab sample during a medical screening for the coronavirus in Mumbai on Wednesday. The number of registered coronavirus cases passed 5 million on Wednesday. Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images