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A health-care worker prepares to administer a free monkeypox vaccine in Wilton Manors, Florida. The question: Can vaccination slow the outbreak? Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The COVID-19 pandemic has hit Japan's alcohol industry hard, sharpening a long-running trend away from drinking. A new campaign sponsored by the National Tax Agency hopes to change that — but it's running into sharp criticism. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

This computer illustration shows the E. coli bacteria in blood. An outbreak in Michigan and Ohio is under investigation as health officials try to determine the source. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

How do mosquitoes smell us out? And how can we stop them? A new study offers a surprising answer to the first question — and hope for better preventive strategies as a result. LWA/Getty Images hide caption

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LWA/Getty Images

Mosquitoes surprise researcher with their 'weird' sense of smell

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The federal government wants to roll out another round of COVID-19 boosters this fall but drugmakers are still testing the new boosters. The Food and Drug Administration has said it will base its evaluation of the boosters on data from mouse studies, in a controversial move. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

What's behind the FDA's controversial strategy for evaluating new COVID boosters

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Surgical instruments used in a kidney transplant in 2016. The agency that oversees organ allocation, the United Network for Organ Sharing, is under scrutiny after a report documented loss and waste of donated organs, often because of problems transporting the organs. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Molly Riley/AP

Transplant agency is criticized for donor organs arriving late, damaged or diseased

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The head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced a shake-up of the nation's top public health agency, in a bid to respond to ongoing criticism and try to make it more nimble. Ron Harris/AP hide caption

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Ron Harris/AP

Football players at Cedar Grove High School in DeKalb County start practice in late July without pads to give them an acclimatization period to get used to the heat. This is a statewide rule from the Georgia High School Association. Matthew Pearson/WABE hide caption

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Matthew Pearson/WABE

How Georgia reduced heat-related high school football deaths

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Period products are seen in a Scottish supermarket in 2020, when Scotland's parliament initially approved legislation to make such products available for free. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

A new rule from the Food and Drug Administration could allow some American adults to buy hearing aids without costly doctor's visits as soon as October. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Philosopher William MacAskill coined the term "longtermism" to convey the idea that humans have a moral responsibility to protect the future of humanity, prevent it from going extinct and create a better future for many generations to come. He outlines this concept in his new book, What We Owe the Future. Matt Crockett hide caption

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Matt Crockett

A package of Aviane birth control pills. The federal program known as Title X provides birth control, tests for sexually transmitted infections, and offers other reproductive health care for low-income patients. Crixell Matthews/VPM hide caption

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Crixell Matthews/VPM

the Imvanex vaccine, used against monkeypox and often referred to as JYNNEOS, is manufactured by only one company: Denmark-based Bavarian Nordic. Global supplies are limited. Africa, where the current outbreak began, is shut out. Alain Jocard/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Is there enough monkeypox vaccine to go around? Maybe yes, more likely no

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Rural communities with struggling hospitals often turn to outside investors willing to take over their health care centers. Some are willing to sell the hospitals for next to nothing to companies that promise to keep them running. MEGAN JELINGER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MEGAN JELINGER/AFP via Getty Images