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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Ermias Kebreab: What do seaweed and cow burps have to do with climate change?

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Jamie Beard: How can we tap into the vast power of geothermal energy?

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Tony D'Amato, director of the University of Vermont's forestry program, visits an experiment site in the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Emma Jacobs for NPR hide caption

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Emma Jacobs for NPR

Foresters hope 'assisted migration' will preserve landscapes as the climate changes

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Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Gary Kazanjian/AP

In this photo provided by the New Mexico National Guard, a New Mexico National Guard Aviation UH-60 Black Hawk flies as part of firefighting efforts, dropping thousands of gallons of water with Bambi buckets from the air on the Calf Canyon/Hermits Peak fire in northern New Mexico on Sunday, May, 1. New Mexico National Guard via AP hide caption

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New Mexico National Guard via AP

Wildfires are causing billions in damage every year and yet many homebuyers have little idea whether their house is at risk. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Is your house at risk of a wildfire? This online tool could tell you

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Commuters make their way through a water-logged street after a heavy downpour in Dhaka. Bangladesh is one of many countries struggling to protect residents from the effects of climate change. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. pledged billions to fight climate change. Then came the Ukraine war

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Veronica Stovall, left, helped her father, Joseph L. Davis, apply for a federally-funded energy-efficiency program in 2021. It turned up significant repair needs. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

A low-income energy-efficiency program gets $3.5B boost, but leaves out many in need

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Solar and wind power projects have been booming in California, like the Pine Tree Wind Farm and Solar Power Plant in the Tehachapi Mountains, but that doesn't mean fossil fuels are fading away quickly. Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

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Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

California just ran on 100% renewable energy, but fossil fuels aren't fading away yet

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Adam Farkes and Leo Azevedo of BNRG at a solar energy project in Augusta, Maine. A bigger project planned on the far side of the fence is on hold because of a federal trade investigation. Fred Bever/Maine Public hide caption

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Fred Bever/Maine Public

Solar projects are on hold as U.S. investigates whether China is skirting trade rules

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Christoph Burgstedt/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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Cynthia Rosenzweig has been named the 2022 World Food Prize Laureate for her work to determine the impact of climate change on worldwide food production. Yana Paskova/for NPR hide caption

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Yana Paskova/for NPR

Lake Charles native James Hiatt looks out across the Devil's Elbow - an off-shoot of the Calcasieu River -toward what could soon be the site of one of nine liquefied natural gas export terminals planned in southwest Louisiana. Halle Parker/WWNO hide caption

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Halle Parker/WWNO

The U.S. may soon export more gas to the EU, but that will complicate climate goals

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People rest in the shade of a tree on a hot summer afternoon in Lucknow in the central Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, on Thursday. Severe heat wave conditions are sweeping north and western parts of India. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

Climate scientists say South Asia's heat wave (120F!) is a sign of what's to come

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This photo taken on April 25 shows the top of Lake Mead drinking water Intake No. 1 above the surface level of the Colorado River reservoir behind Hoover Dam. The intake is the uppermost of three in the deep, drought-stricken lake that provides Las Vegas with 90% of its drinking water supply. Southern Nevada Water Authority via AP/AP hide caption

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Southern Nevada Water Authority via AP/AP

Chris Castillo throws a freshly cut log as he and his cousins clear a wireline along a family member's home in Las Vegas, N.M., on Monday. Wind-whipped flames are marching across more of New Mexico's tinder-dry mountainsides, forcing the evacuation of area residents. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

In Iceland, a Climeworks project is absorbing carbon dioxide emissions directly from the air and storing it underground. The energy-intensive process is powered by geothermal energy. Arnaldur Halldorsson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Arnaldur Halldorsson/Bloomberg via Getty Images