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The Schuylkill River floods Philadelphia in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida in September. The extreme rain caught many by surprise, trapping people in basements and cars and killing dozens. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP
VW Pics/VW PICS/Universal Images Group

A man shelters a baby from the sun with an umbrella during a heatwave in Burgos, northern Spain, Saturday, Aug. 14, 2021. Cities in Europe saw recording-setting heat this summer, with some regions reaching 117.3°F. Alvaro Barrientos/AP hide caption

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Alvaro Barrientos/AP

California's farmers are pumping billions of tons of extra water from underground aquifers this year because of the drought. But new restrictions on such pumping are coming into force. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Satellites reveal the secrets of water-guzzling farms in California

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Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, speaks to members of the media while departing the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 7. Manchin has reportedly told the White House that he opposes the key climate measure in Biden's multitrillion-dollar climate and social programs package. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

When buying her new home in Big Pine Key, Fla., Amy Tripp closed early, just before federal flood insurance rates rose by thousands of dollars. Her rate will still go up more slowly over time. Saul Martinez for NPR hide caption

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Saul Martinez for NPR

The roots of mangrove trees grow above and below the water's edge. Dulyanut Swdp/Getty Images hide caption

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Dulyanut Swdp/Getty Images

The Mighty Mangrove

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Scenes after heavy rainfall flooded a commuter parking lot in Reston, VA with some cars completely submerged. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im

Norway is seeing a record boom in sales of electric cars, which far outpace gas and diesel vehicles. Here, an electric BMW drives on the street in downtown Oslo. Sigrid Harms/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Sigrid Harms/picture alliance via Getty Images

Gas stoves emit pollution into your house and they are connected to a production and supply system that leaks the powerful greenhouse gas methane during drilling, fracking, processing and transport. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

We need to talk about your gas stove, your health and climate change

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Rick Cosyns, a farmer in Madera, Calif., relied on water from the aquifer in years of drought. In other years he could replenish the aquifer with water from the San Joaquin River. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

New protections for California's aquifers are reshaping the state's Central Valley

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The Longview Power Plant, a coal-fired plant, in Maidsville, W.Va. The state's Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin is a key negotiator on President Biden's domestic agenda and a skeptic of the central provision to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Cutting climate programs may be harder than other things as Biden trims his bill

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North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

A mega-drought is hammering the U.S. In North Dakota, it's worse than the Dust Bowl

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A new study reports that children being born now will experience extreme climate events at a rate that is two to seven times higher than people born in 1960. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Kids Born Today Could Face Up To 7 Times More Climate Disasters

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Aaron Fukuda, general manager of Tulare Irrigation District, stands in a basin that's designed to capture floodwater so that it can replenish depleted aquifers. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Water is scarce in California. But farmers have found ways to store it underground

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