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Cargo containers are loaded on ships at a port in Qingdao in China's eastern Shandong province in April. China said it will impose tariffs of 5 percent to 10 percent on $60 billion worth of U.S. products, starting on Monday. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Rice University says many undergraduate students from families with incomes up to $200,000 "will no longer be required to take out loans." Here, a statue of the school's founder, William Marsh Rice, is seen on its campus in Houston. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Fears about how Russian hackers affected the 2016 election seem to have led a number of Americans to expect a foreign country to affect vote tallies in the midterms. There's no evidence such an attack has ever occurred previously. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

NPR/Marist Poll: 1 In 3 Americans Thinks A Foreign Country Will Change Midterm Votes

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his confirmation hearing to replace retired Justice Anthony Kennedy. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A touchscreen voting machine in Sandy Springs, Ga., during the primary election in May 2018. As the midterm congressional primaries heat up amid warnings of Russian hacking, about 1 in 5 Americans will be casting their ballots on machines that do not produce a paper record of their votes. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

The CEO of Berlin's Charite Hospital, Karl Max Einhaeupl (left), and leading doctor Kai-Uwe Eckardt discuss the health of Pyotr Verzilov in Berlin on Tuesday. Verzilov, a member of Russian punk protest band Pussy Riot, was flown to Germany on Sept. 16 after a suspected poisoning. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., listens to Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh as he testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6. Running a tight re-election race in a conservative state, Manchin has faced pressure to support Kavanaugh. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un stand and wave in an open-air Mercedes-Benz as thousands of people welcome their motorcade in Pyongyang. Pyongyang Press Corps/Pool/Reuters hide caption

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Pyongyang Press Corps/Pool/Reuters

Kim Hosts South Korea's Moon For Summit Talks In Pyongyang

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A Russian IL-20M (Ilyushin 20M) aircraft lands at an unknown location. The plane is similar to one that was shot down Tuesday over northwestern Syria. Alexander Kopitar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Kopitar/AFP/Getty Images

SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk, left, shakes hands with Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, right, on Monday, after announcing that he will be the first private passenger on a trip around the moon. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

In the village of Quilin Novillo, the houses are billboards for the American dream. One is painted red, white and blue, with stars and stripes. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Despite Dangers, Intimidation, Guatemalans Still Seek A Better Life In U.S.

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearing Sept. 6. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Rachel Brosnahan accepts the outstanding lead actress in a comedy series award for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel at the 70th Emmy Awards. Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty hide caption

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Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh looks over his notes during the third day of his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing Sept. 6 on Capitol Hill. Senate Democrats want to delay the confirmation vote after sexual assault allegations against Kavanaugh came to light. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Kavanaugh Allegations Recall 1991's Supreme Court Scandal, With Key Differences

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Accompanied by Carnatic music, Indian classical dancer Rama Vaidyanathan performs a Bharat Natyam classical dance at a school in Amritsar in 2011. Narinder Nanu AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Narinder Nanu AFP/Getty Images

India's Carnatic Singers Face Backlash For Performing Non-Hindu Songs

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