Animals Animals

Animals

Drone operators were hoping to find dogs that needed to be rescued from a lava zone on the island of La Palma, Spain. Instead, they found a spray-painted banner that said "The dogs are fine" and was signed "A Team." This still image is from a video sent by the anonymous rescuers. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

An escaped zebra photographed in 2019 in Germany. Three zebras escaped in August from a Maryland farm owned by Jerry Holly, who has now been charged with three counts of animal cruelty. Bernd Wustneck/dpa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bernd Wustneck/dpa/AFP via Getty Images

Jonathan Graziano with his pug, Noodle. The two have taken to forecasting the mood of the day based on whether Noodle stands up or flops down in bed. @jongraz/TikTok hide caption

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@jongraz/TikTok

North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

A Zebra stands in the shade at the Los Angeles Zoo as a heat wave hits Los Angeles on Oct. 6, 2014. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

A two-week-old two-headed diamondback terrapin is being cared for at the Birdsey Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Mass. Steve Heaslip/Cape Cod Times via AP hide caption

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Steve Heaslip/Cape Cod Times via AP

A puffin on Eastern Egg Rock. Brian Bechard/Maine Public hide caption

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Brian Bechard/Maine Public

Climate change is causing problems for puffins

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A blue stripe cockroach (Pseudophyllodromia sp.) on a leaf. Science Photo Library hide caption

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Science Photo Library

Cockroaches are cool!

Cockroaches - do they get a bad rap? Producer Thomas Lu teams up with self-proclaimed lesbian cockroach defender Perry Beasley-Hall to convince producer/guest host Rebecca Ramirez that indeed they are under-rated. These critters could number up to 10,000 species, but only about 30 are pesky to humans and some are beautiful! And complicated! And maybe even clean.

Cockroaches are cool!

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Orphaned mountain gorilla Ndakasi lies in the arms of her caregiver Andre Bauma on Sept. 21, shortly before her death. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Opinion: A gorilla's life and death, in 2 viral photos

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Mathieu Shamavu, a ranger and caretaker at the Senkwekwe Center for Orphaned Mountain Gorillas, poses for a photo with female orphaned gorillas Ndakasi, left, and Ndeze, center, at the the Senkwekwe Center for Orphaned Mountain Gorillas in Virunga National Park, eastern Congo in 2019 . The 14-year-old mountain gorilla Ndakasi has died after a long illness, the park said. Mathieu Shamavu/AP hide caption

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Mathieu Shamavu/AP

Sake, a three year old Bonobo at the Lola's Sanctuary. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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Ley Uwera for NPR

Bonobos and the evolution of nice

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North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

A mega-drought is hammering the U.S. In North Dakota, it's worse than the Dust Bowl

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480 Otis, who is believed to be around 25 years old, emerged from hibernation looking very thin and facing health problems. But he deftly navigated both inter-bear relationships and a salmon-rich river to put on much-needed weight. N. Boak/National Park Service hide caption

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N. Boak/National Park Service

A bird balances on a temporary floating barrier used to contain oil that seeped into Talbert Marsh, home to about 90 bird species, after a 126,000-gallon oil spill off the coast of Huntington Beach, Calif., over the weekend. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images