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Former science teacher Berna Gómez played a pivotal role in new research on restoring some sight to blind people. She is named as a co-author of the study that was published this week. Moran Eye Center, the University of Utah hide caption

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Moran Eye Center, the University of Utah

Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

In this September 2021 photo provided by NYU Langone Health, a surgical team at the hospital in New York examines a pig kidney attached to the body of a deceased recipient for any signs of rejection. The test was a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Joe Carrotta/AP hide caption

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Joe Carrotta/AP

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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Goran K. Hansson (C), Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and Nobel Economics Prize committee members Peter Fredriksson (L) and Eva Mork (R) give a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT NEWS AGENCY/AFP via Getty Ima hide caption

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CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT NEWS AGENCY/AFP via Getty Ima

Scientists at the Allen Institute for Brain Science uncovered differences among human brain cells (left) those of the marmoset monkey (middle) and mouse in a brain region that controls movement, the primary motor cortex. Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Brain Science

New brain maps could help the search for Alzheimer's treatments

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National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins is stepping down by the end of the year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

White-lined sac-winged bat (saccopteryx bilineata) in the Atlantic rainforest of Brazil. Richard McManus/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard McManus/Getty Images

SURPRISE! It's A...Babbling Baby Bat?

A paper published recently in the journal Science finds similarities between the babbling of human infants and the babbling of the greater sac-winged bat (Saccopteryx bilineata) — a small species of bat that lives in Central and South America. As science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel reports, the researchers believe both bats and humans evolved babbling as a precursor to more complex vocal behavior like singing, or, in the case of people, talking.

SURPRISE! It's A...Babbling Baby Bat?

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A new study finds common climate change terms can be confusing to the public — including phrases describing the transition to cleaner energy sources. Here, a wind turbine operates near a coal-fired power plant in Germany. Patrick Pleul/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Pleul/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Goodbye, Climate Jargon. Hello, Simplicity!

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Long COVID patient Gary Miller receives treatment from physiotherapist Joan Del Arco at the Long COVID Clinic at King George Hospital in Ilford, London, in May. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Carlene Knight, who has a congenital eye disorder, volunteered to let doctors edit the genes in her retina using CRISPR. Franny White/OHSU hide caption

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Franny White/OHSU

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again

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An older child gets vaccinated in Michigan. Pfizer and BioNTech say they will submit a formal request for emergency use authorization of the vaccine in children as young as 5 in the coming weeks. Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An artist's conception of the James Webb Space Telescope after it has unfolded in space. NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez hide caption

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NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

NASA's Got A New, Big Telescope. It Could Find Hints Of Life On Far-Flung Planets

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Illustration of antibodies (y-shaped) responding to an infection with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

How Long Does COVID Immunity Last Anyway?

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Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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An axolotl photographed in Lake Xochimilco. Paul Starosta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Starosta/Getty Images

A Lotl Love For The Axolotl

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In this undated photo provided by the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology in Dummerstorf, Germany, a calf enters a "MooLoo" pen to urinate. Thomas Häntzschel/FBN via AP hide caption

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Thomas Häntzschel/FBN via AP