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Energy

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Flared natural gas is burned off at Apache Corporation's operations at the Deadwood natural gas plant in Garden City, Texas, on Feb. 5, 2015. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Norway is seeing a record boom in sales of electric cars, which far outpace gas and diesel vehicles. Here, an electric BMW drives on the street in downtown Oslo. Sigrid Harms/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Sigrid Harms/picture alliance via Getty Images

Gas stoves emit pollution into your house and they are connected to a production and supply system that leaks the powerful greenhouse gas methane during drilling, fracking, processing and transport. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

We need to talk about your gas stove, your health and climate change

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Oil is seen on the beach in Huntington Beach, California on October 3, 2021, after a pipeline breach connected to an oil rig off shore started leaking oil, according to an Orange County Supervisor. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

A man uses his smartphone flashlight to light up his bowl of noodles as he eats breakfast at a restaurant during a blackout in Shenyang, in northeastern China's Liaoning province, Wednesday. People ate breakfast by flashlight and shopkeepers used portable generators as power cuts imposed to meet official conservation goals disrupted manufacturing and daily life. Olivia Zhang/AP hide caption

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Olivia Zhang/AP

Why China has to ration electricity and how that could affect everyone

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Wilma Banks, who lives in the neighborhood of New Orleans East, sits on her bed next to her nebulizer and CPAP machine. In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, when much of New Orleans was left without power, she wasn't able to power up the medical devices and had only her limited supply of inhalers to widen her airways. Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica hide caption

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Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica

Entergy Resisted Upgrading New Orleans' Power Grid. Residents Paid The Price

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A patchwork of national and state regulations require utilities to trim around their power lines. More than a dozen of the country's largest utilities told NPR that falling trees and branches represent a leading cause of outages. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Climate Change Is Killing Trees And Causing Power Outages

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Steam rises from the Miller coal power plant in Adamsville, Ala., in April. An industry group says a climate plan in Congress would shut down all U.S. coal plants by 2030 or earlier. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Harvard University President Lawrence Bacow said Thursday that the university will move to end its investments in fossil fuel companies, though stopped short of using the word "divest." Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Pope Francis, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Portal Welby and Archbishop of Constantinople and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, shown at a meeting of prayer in the Basilica of St. Francis in 2016, are asking for climate action. Vatican pool photo/Getty Images hide caption

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Vatican pool photo/Getty Images
Courtesy of TED

Amanda Little: What Is The Future Of Our Food?

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Polymetallic nodules coat fields of the ocean floor and are rich in critical minerals needed to make batteries for electric vehicles. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research hide caption

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NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

In December 1955, a man posts a price for leaded gasoline at a station in Everett, Massachusetts. The United Nations said on Monday that the world is no longer using the toxic fuel, bringing an end to a century of damaging pollution. Anonymous/Associated Press hide caption

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Anonymous/Associated Press

The World Has Finally Stopped Using Leaded Gasoline. Algeria Used The Last Stockpile

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Out of order notes are left on gas pumps to warn motorists of outages Hollywood, Calif. on May 12, 2021, immediately after the Colonial Pipeline shutdown. Two of its lines were temporarily shut down ahead of Hurricane Ida this weekend. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Caribou graze in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in 2001. U.S. District Judge Sharon Gleason has thrown out the Trump administration's approval for a massive oil project on Alaska's North Slope, saying the federal review was flawed and didn't include mitigation measures for polar bears. AP hide caption

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AP