Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Part of a destroyed mobile home park is pictured in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Florida on September 30, 2022. GIORGIO VIERA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GIORGIO VIERA/AFP via Getty Images

In July, this Beijing payphone began ringing. Who was calling? Aowen Cao/NPR hide caption

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Aowen Cao/NPR

A public payphone in China began ringing and ringing. Who was calling?

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A large fire in a recently deforested area of the Amazon rainforest along Highway BR-319 in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, on Sept. 25. Bruno Kelly for NPR hide caption

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Bruno Kelly for NPR

Brazil's election could determine the fate of the Amazon after surging deforestation

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Monica Medina, assistant secretary of state for oceans and international environmental and scientific affairs is pictured on Sept. 20 in New York City. She will take on additional responsibilities as an envoy on biodiversity and water resources. Monica Schipper/Getty Images for WWF Internation hide caption

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Monica Schipper/Getty Images for WWF Internation

Raffiella Chapman stars as Vesper, a 13-year-old bio-hacker. Courtesy of IFC Films hide caption

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Courtesy of IFC Films

In a bio-engineered dystopia, 'Vesper' finds seeds of hope

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A diver in the Revillagigedo Archipelago interacts with giant mantas as part of a citizen science cruise led by Dr. Alfredo Giron. Alfredo Giron hide caption

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Alfredo Giron

Hurricane Ian left debris in Punta Gorda, Fla., after it made landfall. Storms like Ian are more likely because of climate change. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Climate change makes storms like Ian more common

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This photograph, taken on February 24, 2014 during an aerial survey mission by Greenpeace in Indonesia, shows cleared trees in a forest located in the concession of Karya Makmur Abadi, which was being developed for a palm oil plantation. Environmental group Greenpeace on February 26 accused US consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble of aiding the destruction of Indonesian rainforests. BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images

Few large grasslands remain intact. Though they play a huge role in limiting the effects of climate change, they are threatened and tend to have few protections. Tracy Kressner hide caption

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Tracy Kressner

A Steag coal power plant in Herne, Germany, on Aug. 25. The Essen-based energy company Steag wanted to convert the old coal-fired power plant Herne 4 into a gas-fired power plant at the beginning of the year. In March, Steag decided to postpone the conversion and to continue firing the old power plant with coal. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A worker performs maintenance on pipes used during brine extraction at a lithium mine in the Atacama Desert in Chile on Aug. 24. Paz Olivares Droguett for NPR hide caption

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Paz Olivares Droguett for NPR

In Chile's desert lie vast reserves of lithium — key for electric car batteries

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A late Triassic-era rausuchian, one of the rival reptile lineages who lost out to the dinosaurs. Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons