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The photos of five people slain in the Capital Gazette newsroom adorn candles at a vigil in June. The attack was mentioned in the analysis of Reporters Without Borders' annual World Press Freedom Index. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Union members picket a Stop & Shop in Dorchester, Mass., prior to the arrival of former Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Jet Airways planes are grounded at Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport in Mumbai, India, on Thursday after the airline announced it was shutting down because of financial problems. Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images

The writers' union says that talent agencies are taking too large a share in the deals they negotiate, and that conflicts of interest may prevent them from working in their clients' best interest. David Livingston/Getty Images hide caption

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David Livingston/Getty Images

For those who are scared of flying, an array of apps, websites and classes teach relaxation techniques and explain how airplanes work. Francisco Rama/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Francisco Rama/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

After Boeing Crashes, More People Want Help Taming Fear Of Flying

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Tremaine Smalls (center) attaches parts to an engine at Volvo's plant in Ridgeville, S.C. The automaker has shifted its exports to Europe as the result of the U.S. trade war with China. Camila Domonoske/NPR hide caption

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Camila Domonoske/NPR

Trump's Trade War Forces Volvo To Shift Gears In South Carolina

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A branch of Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt, Germany. The company has received subpoenas from two U.S. House committees about its business dealings with President Trump. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

Analysts say Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and the company were slow to take responsibility in the crashes of two 737 Max planes within months of each other. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

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Tiger Woods celebrates after making his putt on the 18th green to win the Masters at Augusta National Golf Club on Sunday in Augusta, Georgia. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Jessica Holloway-Haytcher uses an app that helps her track meals, exercise and keep in touch with an online coach. Mark Rogers Photography hide caption

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Mark Rogers Photography

My New Diet Is An App: Weight Loss Goes Digital

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Trying to make the world a better place: (left to right) Skoll Award winners Gregory Rockson of mPharma, Nicola Galombik and Maryana Iskander of Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator, Nancy Lublin of Crisis Text Line, Bright Simons of mPedigree and Julie Cordua of Thorn. Greg Smolonski/Skoll hide caption

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Greg Smolonski/Skoll

The IRS budget has been cut sharply over the past decade, but President Trump has suggested spending an extra $362 million on tax enforcement next year. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

On Tax Day, The IRS Is Short Of Money

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