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Economy

Nitin Bajaj surveys the damaged empty kitchen earlier this month. The stove the tenants took with them has been replaced, but there is still much work to be done. Jessica Ruiz for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Ruiz for NPR

They didn't pay rent and stole the fridge. Pandemic spawns nightmare tenants

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Cargo containers sit stacked on ships at the Port of Los Angeles, the nation's busiest container port, on October 15, 2021 in San Pedro, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30. The Fed announced new restrictions on investments by senior officials after being rocked by a controversy involving trading by two regional Fed bank presidents last year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/Getty Images

The company SpotHero built a Zen Den to help employees avoid burnout. Stacey Vanek Smith/NPR hide caption

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Stacey Vanek Smith/NPR

Burnout (Classic)

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Keep calm, it’s just the bullwhip effect

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Labor market trick-or-treat

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Thirty-five years ago, Janet Jackson released an album that changed the course of her career, and of pop music. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Bonus: Janet Jackson's 'Control'

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BRAND new friends

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30. Powell's term expires early next year, and President Biden must decide whether to reappoint him. Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief

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People walk on a pedestrian overhead bridge past construction cranes at the Central Business District in Beijing on Monday. China's economic growth sank in the latest quarter as a slowdown in construction and curbs on energy use weighed on its recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Students at Patterson High School in Patterson, Calif., are participating in the one of the first truck-driving programs for students at a non-vocational high school in the country. Dave Dein/Patterson High School hide caption

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Dave Dein/Patterson High School
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Indicators of the Week: strikes, prices, Black Friday deals

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

Congressional game theory

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Scenes after heavy rainfall flooded a commuter parking lot in Reston, VA with some cars completely submerged. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Second Liberty Loan of 1917 Poster (Photo by Swim Ink 2, LLC/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images) Swim Ink 2, LLC/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Swim Ink 2, LLC/Corbis via Getty Images

Simon says we're stuck with the debt ceiling

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Millions of retirees on Social Security will get a 5.9% boost in benefits for 2022. The biggest cost-of-living adjustment in 39 years follows a burst in inflation as the economy struggles to shake off the drag of the coronavirus pandemic. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

The price of glass jars to hold pasta sauce and other products has soared during the pandemic. Sauce-maker Paul Guglielmo in Rochester, N.Y., has absorbed some of the increase, but he has also raised prices for consumers. Paul Guglielmo hide caption

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Paul Guglielmo

Cargo traffic jams affect glass bottles too. Your pantry staples could cost more

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Containers are stacked high at the Port of Los Angeles on Sept. 28. A record number of cargo ships are stuck floating and waiting off the Southern California coast amid a supply chain crisis that the Biden administration is hoping to ease. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

There's a backlog at U.S. ports. Here's how Biden hopes to get you your goods, faster

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Cyrus Farivar/NPR

A Nobel prize for an economics revolution

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