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ESPN reporter Allison Williams reports from a college basketball tournament at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 8, 2017. Williams said in a recent Instagram video that she is leaving ESPN due to the company's vaccine mandate. Lance King/Getty Images hide caption

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Lance King/Getty Images

In this Oct. 12, 2004, file photo, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc.'s headquarters stands in Hunt Valley, Md. Sinclair Broadcast Group said Monday it's suffered a data breach and is still working to determine what information the data contained. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

The Tribune Tower, the iconic former home of the Chicago Tribune, seen in Chicago, Illinois in 2015. The newspaper lost a quarter of its staff to buyouts after it was acquired by Alden Global Capital in May. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

When this hedge fund buys local newspapers, democracy suffers

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, pictured here at a news conference in May 2019, said on Thursday that his administration is pursuing the prosecution of a local newspaper reporter who alerted the government to website security flaws. Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images hide caption

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Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images

Former Facebook employee and whistleblower Frances Haugen testifies during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Capitol Hill, October 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/Getty Images

Najibullah Quraishi has won numerous awards for his reporting, including three Emmy awards, a Peabody award, an Overseas Press Club award and a DuPont award. He's currently in Kabul, where he's waiting to hear when he can get a flight out of Afghanistan. Courtesy of PBS Frontline hide caption

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Courtesy of PBS Frontline

A more moderate Taliban? An Afghan journalist says nothing has changed

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On a podcast, ESPN anchor Sage Steele called vaccine mandates "sick" and "scary" and questioned why former President Barack Obama identifies as Black even though he was raised by his white mother. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

Marc Lasry, the hedge-fund billionaire and Milwaukee Bucks co-owner who was named chairman of embattled media organization Ozy earlier this month, resigned from its board shortly before the company shut down. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

A Texas judge has found Alex Jones liable for damages in three defamation lawsuits brought by the parents of two children killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre over his claims that the shooting was a hoax. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Ozy co-founder and host Carlos Watson resigned from NPR's board of directors days after The New York Times reported that an Ozy principal had pretended to be a YouTube executive in a meeting with investment bankers. Kimberly White/Getty Images hide caption

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Kimberly White/Getty Images

Jarrod Ramos, the admitted gunman in the attack on the Capital Gazette, was found criminally responsible by a jury in July. A copy of the newspaper is seen in a vending box in Annapolis, Md., on June 29, 2018, the day after the deadly shooting. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Shelley Ross, a veteran TV news executive, said in an opinion piece in the New York Times that Chris Cuomo sexually harassed her by squeezing her buttocks at a party in 2005. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Former President Donald Trump has sued Mary Trump, his niece, and The New York Times over an award-winning 2018 investigation into how much he paid in taxes. Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images

A woman retrieves a copy of The New Yorker magazine from her mailbox in Santa Fe, N.M., in 2020. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

Republican conservative radio show host Larry Elder argues with a TV reporter in an interview Monday after visiting Philippe the Original deli during the campaign for the California gubernatorial recall election in Los Angeles. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

A Right-Wing Media Outfit Powers Larry Elder's Bid For California Governor

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For years, Robert Shireman, shown here at his home in Berkeley, Calif., has been accused of corruptly sharing insider information with investors while serving as a federal official. Those claims aren't true. But they live on. Carolyn Fong for NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Fong for NPR

For 8 Years, A 'Wall Street Journal' Story Haunted His Career. Now He Wants It Fixed

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Journalist and activist Gildo Garza, right, reads the names of murdered journalists at a demonstration outside the federal attorney general's office in Mexico City. Courtesy Gildo Garza hide caption

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Courtesy Gildo Garza

Mexico's Journalists Speak Truth To Power, And Lose Their Lives For It

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Alexanda Amon Kotey, allegedly among four British jihadis who made up a brutal Islamic State cell dubbed "The Beatles," speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Kobani, Syria, on March 30, 2018. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

Neal Conan in the studio during the last broadcast of NPR's Talk of the Nation. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Opinion: Remembering NPR's Neal Conan

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