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Health Care

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Patients say telehealth is OK, but most prefer to see their doctor in person

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Subin Yang for NPR

Applying for health insurance doesn't have to be confusing. Here's a handy glossary

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Pastor Billy Joe Lewis was all in favor when a local health worker suggested a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in the parking lot of his church in Smilax, Ky. "We've still got to use common sense," Lewis says. "Anything that can ward off suffering and death, I think, is a wonderful thing." Jessica Tezak for KHN hide caption

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Jessica Tezak for KHN

A doctor stands at a walk-up coronavirus testing site at West County Health Center in San Pablo, Calif., in April 2020. Pandemic burnout has affected thousands of health care workers. Jessica Christian/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Christian/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Images

The vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The White House says Thursday that the U.S. will commit 17 million additional doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to the African Union. Picture Alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I hide caption

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Picture Alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I

Women rights activists hold up signs as they gather in Washington, DC. to protest the new abortion law in Texas. While she was instrumental to the early abortion-rights movement, many in the crown may not have known the name Pat Maginnis. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

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Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke's Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

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Kyle Green/AP

With hospitals crowded from COVID, 1 in 5 American families delays health care

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Registered nurse Christie Lindog works at the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, Calif., on Sept. 2. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals brace for an onslaught this winter, from flu as well as COVID

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Colorado's UCHealth hospital system is requiring any prospective organ transplant recipients to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Here, a man receives a COVID-19 vaccine in Thornton, Colo., earlier this year. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Evidence seized from a drug trafficking operation in central California in early 2020 included methamphetamine and fentanyl with a street value of $1.5 million, authorities said. Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP

Studies show burnout ran rampant in health care prior to the pandemic. Now it's a full-blown crisis. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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The Toll Of Burnout On Medical Workers — And Their Patients

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Matthew Crecelius, a traveling contract nurse who has worked in a dozen hospitals since the pandemic began, says that he can recall numerous instances where health care worker burnout has had a direct impact on patient care. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

Democratic lawmakers are proposing a way to offer low-income adults Medicaid in states that have so far refused to expand the program. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., spoke about the issue during a press conference with fellow lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol on September 23, 2021. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Cox Medical Center in Branson, Mo., is implementing a personal panic button system for hundreds of its employees. Assaults of hospital staff tripled from 2019 to 2020, the hospital says. Brandei Clifton/Cox Medical Center hide caption

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Brandei Clifton/Cox Medical Center

Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

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Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

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Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX) introduced the "Cover Now Act" outside the U.S. Capitol on June 17, 2021. The bill intends to close the health insurance gap in Texas and 11 other states that have not expanded Medicaid to uninsured adults. A similar fix is part of the spending bill being debated in Congress this week, and would provide affordable coverage for more than 2.2 million Americans. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Michelle Chester, director of employee health services at Northwell Health, prepares the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at Long Island Jewish Valley Stream hospital. Hospitals and nursing homes across the country are preparing for worsening staff shortages as state deadlines arrive for employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Eduardo Munoz/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/AP

A supporter of pop star Britney Spears participating in a #FreeBritney rally on July 14 in Washington, D.C. When anyone poses a high risk of harm to themselves or others, psychiatrists are obligated to hospitalize them, even against their will. For many patients, paying for that involuntary care leads to long-term financial strain. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images