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The Food and Drug Administration is moving to approve over-the-counter hearing aids in a change that lawmakers and advocates have long called for. Here, a man displays his hearing aid before taking part in a meeting. Keith Bedford/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Keith Bedford/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Having a birth plan can prepare you for pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum. Bee Harris for NPR hide caption

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Bee Harris for NPR

Beyond delivery: How a birth plan can prepare you for all four trimesters

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Patients say telehealth is OK, but most prefer to see their doctor in person

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Subin Yang for NPR

Applying for health insurance doesn't have to be confusing. Here's a handy glossary

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Add five-minute stints of fun and easy exercise to your day at home by working with what's around you, says trainer Molly McDonald. Cha Pornea for NPR hide caption

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Cha Pornea for NPR

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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Restaurant food and packaged foods are often high in salt to make them more palatable. The Food and Drug Administration wants to see the food industry gradually reduce sodium levels in these foods. Eric Savage/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Savage/Getty Images

Eating too much salt is making Americans sick. Even a 12% reduction can save lives

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Gloria Clemons gives a COVID-19 vaccine to Navy veteran Perry Johnson at the Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital in Hines, Ill., in September. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Breakthrough infections might not be a big transmission risk. Here's the evidence

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In federal lawsuits, parents in Wisconsin are blaming school districts for coronavirus infections, saying they should not have ended mask requirements during a pandemic. Here, a student in Michigan is seen arriving at school in late August. Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images

Gas stoves emit pollution into your house and they are connected to a production and supply system that leaks the powerful greenhouse gas methane during drilling, fracking, processing and transport. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

We need to talk about your gas stove, your health and climate change

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Above, a child walks by a Christmas display in New York City last year. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, says it's "too soon to tell" whether Americans will be able to gather during the winter holidays. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Matthew Crecelius, a traveling contract nurse who has worked in a dozen hospitals since the pandemic began, says that he can recall numerous instances where health care worker burnout has had a direct impact on patient care. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

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Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

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A Planet Fitness employee cleans equipment before a gym's reopening in March in Inglewood, Calif., after being closed due to COVID-19. Reduced access to recreation likely has contributed to weight gain during the pandemic. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Carlene Knight, who has a congenital eye disorder, volunteered to let doctors edit the genes in her retina using CRISPR. Franny White/OHSU hide caption

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Franny White/OHSU

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again

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The COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson was a one-shot regime. But data shows that people who got the shot may have waning immunity, and some doctors say a second shot would be a good idea. Stephen Zenner/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Zenner/Getty Images

Weightlifting or other forms of strength training can be a smart addition to your exercise routines. It can help stave off chronic illness and manage weight gain. gradyreese/Getty Images hide caption

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gradyreese/Getty Images

The U.S. is preparing for COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, though exactly who needs one is not entirely clear. Emily Elconin/Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Getty Images

The pandemic appears to have peaked or be on the verge of peaking, with cases projected to slowly decline this fall and winter. As recently as Sept. 8, people were waiting at COVID-19 testing site in Kentucky, where over 4,000 new cases were confirmed that day. Jeffrey Dean/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Dean/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Is The Worst Over? Models Predict A Steady Decline In COVID Cases Through March

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