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Breathing slowly and deeply through the nose is associated with a relaxation response, says James Nestor, author of Breath. As the diaphragm lowers, you're allowing more air into your lungs and your body switches to a more relaxed state. Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library hide caption

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Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library

How The 'Lost Art' Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

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Memorial Day weekend at Robert Moses State Park on Fire Island, N.Y. As the pandemic continues, Harvard's Dr. Ashish Jha says, mask wearing, social distancing and robust strategies of testing and contact tracing will be even more important. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nearing 100,000 COVID-19 Deaths, U.S. Is Still 'Early In This Outbreak'

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With physician offices not seeing patients with COVID-19 symptoms in April, Timothy Regan said he had little choice when Denver Health directed him first to its urgent care facility and then to its emergency room. "I felt bad, but I had been dealing with it for a while," he says. Ethan Welty for KHN hide caption

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Ethan Welty for KHN

ER Visit For COVID-19 Symptoms Stuck Man With A $3,278 Bill

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Denise and Richard Victor of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., have been missing their grandkids, whom they haven't seen since February. Before the pandemic, they had regular visits with grandsons (from left) Daren Cosola, Stirling Victor, Davis Victor and Lucas Cosola. Courtesy of the Victor family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Victor family

A worker wipes down surfaces on a New York City subway car to disinfect seats during the coronavirus outbreak. The CDC is clarifying its guidance on touching surfaces after a change to its website triggered news reports. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Kelly/Reuters
Ryhor Bruyeu/Getty Images/EyeEm

How Body Positivity Can Lead To Better Health

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Blood collection tubes sit in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand, Fla., on May 4. Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Getting An Antibody Test For The Coronavirus? Here's What It Won't Tell You

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Anthony Reyes, a police officer with the City of Miami, shows the results of his coronavirus antibody test at the Hard Rock Stadium testing site in Miami Gardens, Fla., in early May. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A Double-Barreled Approach To Antibody Testing Could Improve Accuracy

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Clare Schneider/NPR
Clare Schneider/NPR

An Illustrated Guide To Showing Up For Yourself

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Bar owner Michael Mattson toasts with patrons as his Friends and Neighbors bar reopens Wednesday in Appleton, Wis. Bars were able to open their doors after the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the state's "Safer at Home" order. William Glasheen/USA Today via Reuters hide caption

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William Glasheen/USA Today via Reuters
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Grief For Beginners: 5 Things To Know About Processing Loss

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A medical worker walks in front of Transformé MD Medical Center in White Plains, N.Y., where antibody testing was being offered. Pablo Monsalve/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Monsalve/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images

Will Antibodies After COVID-19 Illness Prevent Reinfection?

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Emergency room physicians are seeing a drop in admissions for heart attacks and strokes. They worry patients who have delayed care may be sicker when they finally arrive in emergency rooms. Studio 642/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Eerie Emptiness Of ERs Worries Doctors: Where Are The Heart Attacks And Strokes?

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The practice of palliative care is changing under the pandemic: Doctors and nurses are learning new ways to help patients and families communicate their treatment goals and make decisions about end-of-life care. Reza Estakhrian/Getty Images hide caption

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Reza Estakhrian/Getty Images

Patients Dying Fast, And Far From Family, Challenge Practice Of Palliative Care

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