Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

"The profession we love has been taken over," psychiatrist and novelist Samuel Shem tells NPR, "with us sitting there in front of screens all day, doing data entry in a computer factory." Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria — rod-shaped bacteria in this tinted, scanning electron microscope image — are found in soil, water and as normal flora in the human intestine. But they can cause serious wound, lung, skin and urinary tract infections, and many pseudomonas strains are drug-resistant. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Science Source

How Best To Use The Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Germs?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/778261164/778766598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new book by anthropologist and physician Kimberly Sue tells the stories of women navigating opioid addiction during and after incarceration. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

To deal with chronic pain, Pamela Bobb's morning routine now includes stretching and meditation at home in Fairfield Glade, Tenn. Bobb says this mind-body awareness intervention has greatly reduced the amount of painkiller she needs. Jessica Tezak for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Tezak for NPR

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/743065892/778158877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maryland now offers the country's first master's degree in the study of the science and therapeutics of cannabis. Pictured, an employee places a bud into a bottle for a customer at a weed dispensary in Denver, Colo. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/777695183/777957260" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mourners hold candles as they gather for a vigil at a memorial outside Cielo Vista Walmart in El Paso, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said Friday that fluid extracted from the lungs of 29 injured patients who vaped all contained the chemical compound vitamin E acetate. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hans Pennink/AP

Brelahn Wyatt, a Navy ensign and second-year medical student, shares a hug with Shetland. The dog's military commission does not entitle him to salutes. Julie Rovner/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Rovner/KHN

Two fourth-graders rock side to side while doing math equations at Charles Pinckney Elementary School's "Brain Room" in Charleston, S.C., in 2015. John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Melinda McDowell sought treatment for her addiction to meth. She started taking the medication naltrexone and has been sober for more than a year now. Andrea Dukakis/CPR News hide caption

toggle caption
Andrea Dukakis/CPR News

A Medication To Treat Meth Addiction? Some Take A New Look At Naltrexone

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776135642/777023949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Roger Severino, director of the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, was a major driver of the rule struck down Wednesday. A federal judge found the rule issued earlier this year — making it easier for health care workers to refuse care for religious reasons — to be an overreach by the department. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776169331/776968368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tom and Dana Saputo sit in their backyard with their three dogs. Tom Saputo's double-lung transplant was fully covered by insurance, but he was responsible for an $11,524.79 portion of the charge for an air ambulance ride. Anna Almendrala/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Almendrala/KHN

Cover detail of Volume Control, by David Owen. Penguin Random House hide caption

toggle caption
Penguin Random House

From Lawn Mowers To Rock Concerts, Our 'Deafening World' Is Hurting Our Ears

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776242285/776396463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 2015, the New York legislature in Albany passed a law to end the practice of surprise medical billing. Research suggests overall health care costs have risen as a result. Walter Bibikow/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Walter Bibikow/Getty Images

A large study published in late October found that weekly injections of Makena during the latter months of pregnancy "did not decrease recurrent preterm births." Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty Images

Controversy Kicks Up Over A Drug Meant To Prevent Premature Birth

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776172053/776207252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Kristen Uroda for NPR

Diagnostic Gaps: Skin Comes In Many Shades And So Do Rashes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/774910915/775982601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kate Clyatt, 28, works seasonally as a ranch hand in southwest Montana, and relies on the state's Medicaid program for health coverage. "Ranching is just not a job with a lot of money in it," Clyatt says. "I don't know at what point I'm going to be able to get off of Medicaid." Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Rural Seasonal Workers Worry About Montana Medicaid's Work Requirements

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/766115339/775818757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

To sleep better, exercise daily and limit caffeine and alcohol. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Sun/NPR

Body Clock Blues? Time Change Is Tough. Here's How To Sleep Well Tonight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705224359/714277989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

About