Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

In between answering 911 calls, Jerrad Dinsmore (left) and Kevin LeCaptain perform a wellness check at the home of a woman in her nineties. The ambulance team in the small town of Waldoboro, Maine was already short-staffed. Then a team member quit recently, after the state mandated all health care workers get the COVID-19 vaccine. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

In Maine, a looming vaccine deadline for EMTs is stressing small-town ambulance crews

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1040425763/1047850992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Starghill for NPR

A health care worker prepares a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during a clinic held at the Watts Juneteenth Street Fair in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images
Dan Wood/NPR

What to know about your risk of a serious or fatal breakthrough COVID infection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1047727415/1047891670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hospitals around the U.S., including large academic medical centers like Vanderbilt University's in Nashville, Tenn., have been forced to rely on traveling nurses to keep their intensive care units fully staffed. The demand for travel nurses has driven up their hourly rates, which then motivates more staff nurses to leave in pursuit of a traveling gig. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

toggle caption
Blake Farmer/WPLN

Worn-out nurses hit the road for better pay, stressing hospital budgets — and morale

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1046131313/1047333523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Miakievy/Getty Images

Patients say telehealth is OK, but most prefer to see their doctor in person

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1044358309/1047036984" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Pastor Billy Joe Lewis was all in favor when a local health worker suggested a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in the parking lot of his church in Smilax, Ky. "We've still got to use common sense," Lewis says. "Anything that can ward off suffering and death, I think, is a wonderful thing." Jessica Tezak for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Tezak for KHN

Add five-minute stints of fun and easy exercise to your day at home by working with what's around you, says trainer Molly McDonald. Cha Pornea for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cha Pornea for NPR

Nurse Christina Garibay administers Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine to a man at a community outreach event in Los Angeles in August. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

A nurse draws a vaccine dose from a vial of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine at a community center in Bowie, Md., in March. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The No Surprises Act is intended to stop surprise medical bills. It could also slow the growth of health insurance premiums. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke's Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kyle Green/AP

With hospitals crowded from COVID, 1 in 5 American families delays health care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1043414558/1045904290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators march during a protest against Asian hate in Times Square in New York in March after a troubling spike in violence against the Asian American community during the coronavirus pandemic. Michael Nagle/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Nagle/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

With racial attacks on the rise, Asian Americans fear for their safety

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045746655/1045746656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Janet Gerber, a health department worker in Louisville, Ky., processes boxes containing vials of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine in March. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045485935/1045747534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Restaurant food and packaged foods are often high in salt to make them more palatable. The Food and Drug Administration wants to see the food industry gradually reduce sodium levels in these foods. Eric Savage/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Savage/Getty Images

Eating too much salt is making Americans sick. Even a 12% reduction can save lives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045651839/1045747034" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gloria Clemons gives a COVID-19 vaccine to Navy veteran Perry Johnson at the Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital in Hines, Ill., in September. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Breakthrough infections might not be a big transmission risk. Here's the evidence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1044553048/1045337873" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

NPR poll: The delta surge pushed Americans further behind in all walks of life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1044475441/1045182673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surgeons remove the liver and kidneys of a deceased donor, for later transplantation. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Owen Franken/Getty Images

In the quest for a liver transplant, patients are segregated by prior alcohol use

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1041867003/1044842419" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Registered nurse Christie Lindog works at the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, Calif., on Sept. 2. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals brace for an onslaught this winter, from flu as well as COVID

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1044342789/1044973192" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas may lead to increase in appetite and weight gain, research finds. Pornchai Jaito/EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

toggle caption
Pornchai Jaito/EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

About