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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Davilla/Getty Images

A Chicago woman in her 60s is the second U.S. citizen to become infected with the dangerous new coronavirus, health officials said. Tami Chappell/Reuters hide caption

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Tami Chappell/Reuters

2nd U.S. Case Of Wuhan Coronavirus Confirmed

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Airport officials screen for possible cases of the novel coronavirus at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport in Wuhan, China, where the illness originated. Emily Wang/AP hide caption

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Emily Wang/AP

Can Airport Screening Help Stop The Spread Of Wuhan Coronavirus?

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Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

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Abortion-rights supporters demonstrate last May in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A high court decision in a case that could curtail or even overturn Roe v. Wade is set for opening arguments in March. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Generics may not have the same cost-lowering power for specialty medicines, such as multiple sclerosis drugs, researchers find. That's true especially when other brand-name drugs are approved to treat a given disease before the first generic is approved. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When Heather Woock was conceived, her mom sought the help of a fertility specialist. What happened next was not what she was led to believe. But it took three decades for it to come to light. Leah Klafczynski for NPR hide caption

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Leah Klafczynski for NPR

Her Own Birth Was 'Fertility Fraud' And Now She Needs Fertility Treatment

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Sepsis arises when the body overreacts to an infection, and blood vessels throughout the body become leaky. Researchers now estimate that about 11 million people worldwide died with sepsis in 2017 alone — that's about 20% of all deaths. Medic Image/Universal Images Gr/Getty Images hide caption

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Medic Image/Universal Images Gr/Getty Images

Stealth Disease Likely To Blame For 20% Of Worldwide Deaths

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth

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Teri Hines says she had a bout of depression during the lead up to menopause in her mid-40s. For many women, the lead-up to menopause can trigger mood issues. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

As Menopause Nears, Be Aware It Can Trigger Depression And Anxiety, Too

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A light micrograph of a primitive human embryo, composed of four cells, following the initial mitotic divisions that ultimately transform a single-cell organism into one composed of millions of cells. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns

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Jennifer Ford of Oakham, Mass., went through serious postpartum depression after her second pregnancy. She got help from her obstetrician after he connected with a statewide program that supports doctors. Kieran Kesner for NPR hide caption

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Kieran Kesner for NPR

'A Lifeline' For Doctors Helps Them Treat Postpartum Depression

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