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Health Care

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

It wasn't easy in early March to get a test in the U.S. confirming you had the coronavirus — scarce availability of tests meant patients had to meet strict criteria linked to a narrow set of symptoms and particular travel history. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Specimens collected from multiple people can be combined into one batch to test for the coronavirus. A negative result would clear all the specimens. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Pooling Coronavirus Tests Can Spare Scarce Supplies, But There's A Catch

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Texas Hospital CEO: People Need To Change Their Behaviors 'Dramatically'

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Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

How Much Would Coronavirus Vaccine Cost?

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People get tested for the coronavirus at a drive-through site in Phoenix last month. In Arizona, the portion of tests coming back positive now hovers around 24%, more than three times the national average. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Tables are marked with X's for social distancing in the outdoor dining area of a restaurant in Los Angeles, Wednesday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered a three-week closure of bars and indoor operations of restaurants and certain other businesses in Los Angeles and 18 other counties as the state copes with increasing cases of COVID-19. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Amber England, who led the successful campaign for a ballot initiative to give 200,000 more Oklahomans health coverage, talked with supporters online this week. Voters narrowly approved the Medicaid expansion measure Tuesday, despite opposition by the state's governor and legislature. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Tuesday. Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

Fauci: Mixed Messaging On Masks Set U.S. Public Health Response Back

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Foreign-Born Doctors Start Their Residencies At U.S. Hospitals Amid The Pandemic

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Dr. Danielle Hairston, a psychiatry residency director at Howard University in Washington, D.C., trains and mentors young black doctors. Quraishia Ford hide caption

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Quraishia Ford

To Be Young, A Doctor And Black: Overcoming Racial Barriers In Medical Training

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Dr. Danielle Ofri, author of When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error, says medical mistakes are likely to increase as resource-strapped hospitals treat a rapid influx of COVID-19 patients. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A Doctor Confronts Medical Errors — And Flaws In The System That Create Mistakes

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Gilead Sciences, maker of the antiviral drug remdesivir, has come up with a price for the COVID-19 treatment that was less than some analysts expected. ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

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