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Health Care

Supreme Court Hears Arguments On Another Case Involving The Affordable Care Act

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New Hampshire Voters Share Their Views On Medicare For All

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Nearly 30 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, planes still lag behind many buses and trains. Regulations prohibit passengers from sitting in their own wheelchairs on commercial flights. Jon Hicks/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Hicks/Getty Images

Health insurers say the U.S. government owes them more than $12 billion in payments that were rescinded by a Republican-controlled Congress. The money was supposed to subsidize insurers' expected losses between 2014 and 2016. Phil Roeder/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Roeder/Getty Images

Medicare's overhauled Plan Finder debuted at the end of August. But health care advocates and insurance agents say the website has had big problems ever since, including inaccurate details about prices, which drugs each plan covers and their dosages. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Dr. Laurie Punch, a trauma surgeon at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, is adamant that violence is a true medical problem doctors must treat in both the operating room and the community. Whitney Curtis for KHN hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for KHN

White House Announces Program To Distribute Free HIV-Prevention Medication

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Dr. BJ Miller's new project, the Center for Dying and Living, is a website designed for people to share their stories related to living with illness, disability or loss, or their stories of caring for someone with those conditions. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

After A Freak Accident, A Doctor Finds Insight Into 'Living Life And Facing Death'

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Presidential candidates recognize health care is a key voting concern. But polled Democrats don't yet agree on the best solution. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The Cambria factory in Minnesota manufactures slabs of engineered quartz for kitchen and bathroom countertops. If businesses don't follow worker protection rules, cutting these slabs to fit customers' kitchens can release lung-damaging silica dust. Cambria hide caption

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Cambria

'There's No Good Dust': What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

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As University Hospital Hounds Debtors, Doctors Say It's Doing Harm

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR and KHN

When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help

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Years ago, Portia Smith (center) was afraid to seek care for her postpartum depression because she feared child welfare involvement. She and her daughters Shanell Smith (right), 19, and Najai Jones Smith (left), 15, pose for a selfie in February after makeup artist Najai made up everyone as they were getting ready at home to go to a movie together. Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer hide caption

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Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer

Black Mothers Get Less Treatment For Their Postpartum Depression

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