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Actress Annabella Sciorra described in detail the alleged assault by Harvey Weinstein during his trial on Thursday. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Actress Annabella Sciorra Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Raped Her

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Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor was convicted in a bribery and kickback scheme that prosecutors said helped fuel the opioid crisis. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Pharmaceutical Executive John Kapoor Sentenced To 66 Months In Prison In Opioid Trial

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Presiding Judge Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf, fourth from right, reads the ruling. The panel said Myanmar must take steps to protect the Muslim minority, who "remain extremely vulnerable" after a brutal 2017 crackdown by the military. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Kendra Espinoza stands with her daughters outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Espinoza is the lead plaintiff in a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Could Be Headed To A Major Unraveling Of Public School Funding

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The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., sits at the center of what top Democrats and some ethics advisers see as a unique web of conflicts of interest. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Harvey Weinstein leaves court in New York City on Tuesday. The former Hollywood megaproducer, whose career unraveled beneath scores of allegations, is facing multiple criminal charges of rape and predatory sexual assault. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

President Trump discusses the planned travel ban extension Wednesday during a news conference at the 50th World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told that student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help. Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All

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Randi Weingarten, of the American Federation of Teachers, says the message of her organization's lawsuit is clear: "Protect the students of the United States of America — not the for-profit [schools] that are making a buck off of them." Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images

Teachers Union Lawsuit Claims DeVos 'Capriciously' Repealed Borrower Protections

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Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Some Push To Change State Laws That Require HIV Disclosure To Sexual Partners

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Kendra Espinoza, the lead plaintiff in the case, has two daughters attending Stillwater Christian School in Kalispell, Mont. She is an office manager and staff accountant who works extra jobs to pay for her children's tuition. Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice hide caption

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Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice

Supreme Court Considers Religious Schools Case

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A pro-choice activist holds a sign as Sen. Cory Booker, a Democrat from New Jersey, speaks during a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in May. A recent Gallup poll found that more Americans want less strict abortion laws. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Drinking fountains are marked "Do Not Drink Until Further Notice" at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich., in May 2016. After 18 months of insisting that water drawn from the Flint River was safe to drink, officials admitted it was not. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Abortion-rights supporters demonstrate last May in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A high court decision in a case that could curtail or even overturn Roe v. Wade is set for opening arguments in March. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Amtrak has rescinded its charge of $25,000 each for two wheelchair users and will charge them just the normal ticket price. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

This undated photo provided by the Honolulu Police Department shows Officers Tiffany Enriquez (left) and Kaulike Kalama. They were killed Sunday while responding to a call. AP hide caption

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Demonstrators stand outside a security zone in Richmond, Va., on Monday. Thousands of activists and gun enthusiasts converged on the city to urge the state not to pass new gun laws. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/WAMU

Richmond Gun Rally: Thousands Of Gun Owners Converge On Virginia Capitol On MLK Day

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