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Daniel Goldman, attorney and director of investigations with the House Intelligence Committee (second from left); committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif; ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif.; and Steve Castor, counsel for the minority, hold the first public hearing of the impeachment inquiry on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on the DACA program. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court May Side With Trump On 'DREAMers'

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A McDonald's employee holds a sign during a 2018 protest against sexual harassment in the workplace in Chicago. Joshua Lott/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP via Getty Images

McDonald's Is Sued Over 'Systemic Sexual Harassment' Of Female Workers

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Connecticut State Police Detective Barbara J. Mattson holds a Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle, the same type of gun used in the Sandy Hook shooting, during a 2013 hearing in Hartford, Conn. The gun-maker Remington is being sued by the families of the victims. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

The Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in a case testing the legality of the DACA program. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

DACA Recipients Look To Supreme Court For Hope

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Family and friends attend a funeral service on Saturday to remember Christina Langford Johnson, a victim of an ambush that killed nine American women and children on Nov. 4 in Mexico. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. has listed the anonymous whistleblower on a list of witnesses Republicans will like to call as part of the impeachment inquiry. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Republicans are asking that Hunter Biden, the son of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, testify as a witness in the impeachment inquiry. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Attorney General William Barr spoke alongside then-Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O'Callaghan, left, in April. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

William Barr Emerges As The Attorney General Trump Wanted. Democrats, Not So Much

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Authorities announced Thursday that a New York-based company and seven of its employees are being charged with fraud, money laundering and illegal importation of equipment manufactured in China. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Until recently, Ernst & Young coached some top women leaders to look "polished" and speak briefly. The large accounting firm has since disavowed the program, arguing its workplace culture promotes women. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Post-#MeToo, Ernst & Young Grapples With Diverging Views Of Its Culture

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Congress has approved the first law making severe animal abuse a federal crime, in a move that Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., calls "a milestone for pet owners and animal lovers across the country." Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Getty Images/Image Source

President Trump has come under scrutiny about his charitable foundation's use of funds. He has been ordered to pay $2 million in damages by a New York judge. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images