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Sergeant First Class Nathan Anslow runs the Inglewood Army recruiting station in Los Angeles. Tom Bowman/NPR hide caption

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Tom Bowman/NPR

Army Scales Back In-Person Recruiting, Deploys Virus Testing Before Basic Training

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The original military courtroom at the U.S. Navy base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, is seen in this photo approved for release by the U.S. military. Walter Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Walter Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

As Pandemic Halts The Military Court At Guantánamo, Critics Call For Its Closure

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U.S. Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, appears at his May 5 confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. The Senate confirmed Ratcliffe as director of national intelligence in a 49-44 vote Thursday. Gabriella Demczuk/AP hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/AP

Former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, shown broadcasting from Moscow in 2014, says he acted as a whistleblower when he shared classified documents with journalist Barton Gellman. Charles Platiau/AP hide caption

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Charles Platiau/AP

Journalist Who Helped Break Snowden's Story Reflects On His High-Stakes Reporting

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A woman in a face mask walks on a deserted Ocean Drive last week in Miami Beach, Fla. War game simulation in the early 2000s foresaw an overwhelmed health care industry struggling to respond to unprecedented demand. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Years Before The Pandemic, War Games Predicted A 'Global Tempest'

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Journalist Barton Gellman's new book, Dark Mirror, focuses on his complicated working relationship with Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked the agency's secret surveillance programs. Here, Snowden, who has lived in Moscow since leaving the U.S. in 2013, appears here via a video at a 2015 conference in Italy. Angela Gennaro/AP hide caption

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Angela Gennaro/AP

The FBI claims Dr. Qing Wang received more than $3.6 million in grants from the NIH while also collecting money for the same research from the Chinese government. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

A pharmacist gives Jennifer Haller a shot in the first-stage safety clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19 on March 16 at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. U.S. officials say they are already seeing efforts by foreign actors to steal information from U.S. firms working on a vaccine and treatments for the virus. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

U.S. Officials: Beware Of China And Others Trying To Steal COVID-19 Research

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn leaves the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., in late 2018. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Justice Department Is Dropping Case Against Ex-Trump Adviser Michael Flynn

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Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, attends a media briefing earlier this year at the Pentagon. He told NPR on Thursday that the U.S. military is still considering "a whole series of protocols" when it comes to the coronavirus. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

"Deepfakes" are digitally altered images that make incidents appear real when they are not. Such altered files could have broad implications for politics. Marcus Marritt for NPR hide caption

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Marcus Marritt for NPR

President Donald Trump talks to reporters before boarding Air Force One on May 5. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

As Trump Pushes Theory Of Virus Origins, Some See Parallels In Lead-Up To Iraq War

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The Navy destroyer USS Pinckney and the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Northland sailed together in the Eastern Pacific on April 26. The ships are part of an "enhanced" push to stop cocaine smuggling. Petty Officer 3rd Class Erick Parsons/U.S. Navy hide caption

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Petty Officer 3rd Class Erick Parsons/U.S. Navy

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn leaves the federal courthouse in Washington in June. Flynn's attorneys say newly released documents prove the FBI laid a "perjury trap" for their client. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP