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Latin America

An aerial view of a near empty park in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday. Right-wing supporters of the president are calling for an end to restrictions put in place to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is unlikely to be arrested and tried in the United States on the drug charges announced Thursday. Matias Delacroix/AP hide caption

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Matias Delacroix/AP

Supermarket workers wear face masks as a precaution against the spread of the new coronavirus inside the metro in Santiago, Chile, on March 18. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Pu Ying Huang (left) and Dylan Baddour walk along an empty street in Cajamarca, Peru, on March 18, while they were moving from a small hotel room to an Airbnb to ride out the country's 15-day lockdown. Pu Ying Huang and Dylan Baddour hide caption

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Pu Ying Huang and Dylan Baddour

A security guard stands at the El Chaparral port of entry on the border in Tijuana, Mexico, last month. The U.S. and Mexico are said to be working out a deal to close their border to nonessential crossings. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images
Piero F Giunti/Latino USA

The All-Women Mariachi Group That's Lifting Our Spirits

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President Trump and Dr. Anthony Fauci answered questions about coronavirus response in a Rose Garden news conference on Friday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump and other U.S. officials met with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and his delegation last weekend at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. Jim Watson /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson /AFP via Getty Images

Central American migrants, sent from the United States, walk out in the streets of Guatemala City after arriving at the airport on Feb. 13, 2020. When asylum-seekers land in Guatemala, they are processed by immigration and asked if they want to stay in Guatemala or return to their countries. They are given 72 hours to decide. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Asylum-Seekers Reaching U.S. Border Are Being Flown To Guatemala

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People walk across the Paseo de la Reforma during the national women's strike "A Day Without Women" in Mexico City, Monday. Thousands of women across Mexico went on strike to protest violence against women. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

People who gathered in Poza Rico last month brought with them posters, T-shirts and jewelry bearing the images of their missing loved ones. Victoria Razo for NPR hide caption

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Victoria Razo for NPR

The Mexican Mothers Who Make A Grim Yearly Search For Missing Loved Ones

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Alan Gross makes a statement after arriving back in the United States on Dec. 17, 2014. A U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor, Gross was imprisoned in Cuba for five years on espionage charges. He told NPR that Sen. Bernie Sanders visited him in detention and remarked that he didn't understand why others criticized Cuba. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Prisoner Recalls Sanders Saying, 'I Don't Know What's So Wrong' With Cuba

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Armed Special Forces soldiers of the Salvadoran Army, following orders of President Nayib Bukele, enter El Salvador's congress during a vote on a security bill on Feb. 9. Salvador Melendez/AP hide caption

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Salvador Melendez/AP

Latin America's Militaries Emerge As Power Brokers, Riot Police And Border Forces

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