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Europe

A health worker wears a protective suit at a nursing home, in Madrid, Spain, on Tuesday. With some of the highest cases of COVID-19 in the world, Spain's public health system is overstretched and in need of supplies. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

Spain's Health Staff Are Catching The Coronavirus As Protective Gear Runs Short

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During a minute of silence commemorating COVID-19 victims, flags fly at half-staff Tuesday at Rome's monument to the unknown soldier. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

Christian Drosten, director of the Institute of Virology at Berlin's Charité hospital, is pictured after a news conference in Berlin on March 26, to comment on the spread of the novel coronavirus in Germany. Michael Kappeler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Kappeler/AFP via Getty Images

'Das Coronavirus' Podcast Captivates Germany With Scientific Info On The Pandemic

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An 1887 self-portrait by artist Vincent van Gogh from the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. Another van Gogh painting was stolen from a Dutch museum early Monday morning. Marc Deville/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Deville/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

People walk in Frederiksberg Gardens in Copenhagen, Denmark, on March 28. Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Residents wash their hands at a station set up by Shining Hope for Communities in Kibera, a neighborhood in Nairobi, Kenya, where running water is scarce. Patrick Meinhardt/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Meinhardt/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook says it's dedicating $100 million to prop up news organizations pummeled by the financial effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook Pledges $100 Million To Aid News Outlets Hit Hard By Pandemic

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Pope Francis delivers the Urbi and Orbi ("To the City and To the World") prayer in an empty St. Peter's Square Friday evening. Yara Nardi/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yara Nardi/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

People gathered on a square in central Stockholm on Thursday. Janerik Henriksson/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Ima hide caption

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Janerik Henriksson/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Ima

Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he will self-isolate and continue to work in 10 Downing Street in London, announcing his positive test for the coronavirus. He's seen here Thursday night, joining in the U.K.'s national applause for health service workers who are helping to fight the coronavirus. Aaron Chown/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron Chown/PA Images via Getty Images

Kosovo's prime minister, Albin Kurti, seen earlier this month in Pristina, saw his government lose power on a no-confidence vote Wednesday. But he and his ministers are likely to stay in office for a while yet, as the coronavirus crisis unfolds. Armend Nimani/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Armend Nimani/AFP via Getty Images

"Fight like your lives depend on it – because they do," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Thursday. He praised social distancing and other efforts to stop the coronavirus — but added that alone, they're not enough. Here, the Magic Bag theater uses its marquee to support the COVID-19 fight in Ferndale, Mich., on March 26. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Emergency medical personnel walk by a high-speed TGV train in Strasbourg station on Wednesday, preparing to evacuate 20 COVID-19 patients to hospitals in western France. Frederick Florin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick Florin/AFP via Getty Images

Young people gather in the Volkspark am Friedrichshain in Berlin on March 18. Germany's fatality rate so far — just 0.5% — is the world's lowest, by a long shot. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

The Spanish Ministry of Health says the country has 47,610 coronavirus cases — and more than 3,400 people have died from COVID-19. Here, a member of the Emergency Military Unit disinfects buildings in Getafe. Sergio Perez/Reuters hide caption

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Sergio Perez/Reuters

Flowers are being destroyed at the flower auction in Aalsmeer, Netherlands, on March 16, 2020. The Dutch horticultural sector is sounding the alarm about the effects of the coronavirus crisis. Due to the loss of demand, the auctions are struggling with low prices and the need to destroy the flowers. Lex Van Lieshout/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lex Van Lieshout/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

Prince Charles has tested positive for the coronavirus and is showing mild symptoms. The heir to the British throne is seen here speaking at a large event on March 12, when he attended a dinner at Mansion House in London. Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images hide caption

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Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images

Spanish army troops disinfecting nursing homes in Madrid found some residents living in squalor among the infectious bodies of people who authorities suspect died from the coronavirus. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

Jacques Enoch with his bike in the Alps in 1941. Danièle Enoch-Maillard's father, who was Jewish, survived World War II in an Alpine village with the help of a deputy mayor and a postal worker who sent smoke signals every time the Nazis headed up the mountain road to the hamlet. The Enoch-Maillard family hide caption

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The Enoch-Maillard family