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Africa

Fatou "Toufah" Jallow says she was raped by former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh. She now lives in Canada but returned home to testify before the nation's Truth Commission. 2019 Human Rights Watch hide caption

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2019 Human Rights Watch

Beauty Queen's Rape Allegation Against Former Gambia President Sparks #MeToo Movement

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Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe first encountered Ebola in 1976, before it had been identified. Since then, from his post at the Congo National Institute for Biomedical Research, he has led the global search for a cure. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

This Congolese Doctor Discovered Ebola But Never Got Credit For It — Until Now

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Nesma (left) and Anys are Algerian siblings who came out to each other at a party. They live in Paris, and both identify as queer. "It now makes us stronger and committed together for the queer and Algerian causes," Anys says. Mikael Chukwuma Owunna hide caption

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Mikael Chukwuma Owunna

Elephants approach a road at Liwonde. Reid says the park hasn't lost a single high-value animal in 30 months. Thoko Chikondi for NPR hide caption

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Thoko Chikondi for NPR

49-Minute Listen

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A health worker gives the oral polio vaccine to a child in Karachi, Pakistan. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

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Fareed Khan/AP

Ghost Viruses And The Taliban Stand In The Way Of Wiping Out Polio

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, seen addressing lawmakers Tuesday, won a Nobel Peace Prize less than two weeks ago — but he now appears embroiled in a standoff with the activist who helped bring down the regime before him. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

Nabia Drammeh, 27, a nurse, talks with Maram Ceesay, and her granddaughter, Awa at the Brufut Minor Health Center outside of Banjul, the capital of the Gambia. Awa's mother passed away during childbirth leaving Maram to look after her. The 2-year-old is being treated for pneumonia. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Fighting Pain Without Opioids: How One Nurse In The Gambia Does It

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A blood transfusion bag hangs in an operating room in a hospital in the Republic of Congo. Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa have a huge gap between blood supply and demand, new research found. Godong/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Godong/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Pascal Bitasimwa, 12, of Goma (in the red shirt) goes to Lake Kivu to fill up jerrycans with water. "This takes me much of my time," he says. "Instead of going to study, I come first to take water." Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Forget About The Tap: A City Of 2 Million Has Virtually No Running Water

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Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge celebrates after busting the elusive two-hour barrier for the marathon Saturday in Vienna. Alex Halada/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Halada/AFP via Getty Images

Botswana has the world's largest elephant population, with some 130,000 animals. Greg Du Toit/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Du Toit/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Orthopedic surgeon Kebba Marenah and his team get ready to perform knee surgery on a 14-year-old at the Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital in Banjul, the capital of Gambia. The country struggles with a lack of access to sufficient pain medications. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

A Place Where The Opioid Problem Is Upside Down

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