Africa Africa

Africa

From left: Sekou Sheriff, of Barkedu village in Liberia, whose parents died at an Ebola treatment center; a polio vaccination booth in Pakistan; a schoolgirl in Ethiopia examines underwear with a pocket for a menstrual pad; an image from a video on the ethics of selfies; Consolata Agunga goes door-to-door as a community health worker in her village in Kenya. From left: John Poole/NPR; Jason Beaubien/NPR; Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.; SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Marc Silver/NPR hide caption

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From left: John Poole/NPR; Jason Beaubien/NPR; Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.; SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Marc Silver/NPR

Children play around trees downed by Cyclone Idai at the Guara Guara resettlement site in Mozambique, where thousands of people are still living more than nine months after the storm. NicholeSobecki/VII for NPR hide caption

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NicholeSobecki/VII for NPR

Mozambique Is Racing To Adapt To Climate Change. The Weather Is Winning

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Nigerian soldiers are on patrol in October, after gunmen suspected of belonging to the Islamic State West Africa Province group raided the village of Tungushe, killing a soldier and three residents. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Justine Adhiambo Obura, chairwoman of the No Sex For Fish cooperative in Nduru Beach, Kenya, stands by her fishing boat. Patrick Higdon, whose name is on the boat, works for the charity World Connect, which gave the group a grant to provide boats for some of the local women. Julia Gunther for NPR hide caption

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Julia Gunther for NPR

No Sex For Fish: How Women In A Fishing Village Are Fighting For Power

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Herbie Tsoaeli Steve Gordon/Musicpics.co.za hide caption

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Steve Gordon/Musicpics.co.za

The South African Songbook: Jazz Musicians Who Stayed During Apartheid

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Nigerien commandos simulate a raid on a militant camp during U.S.-sponsored exercises in Ouallam, Niger, in April 2018. A spokesman for the Nigerien army says 71 soldiers were killed in an attack on Tuesday. Aaron Ross/Reuters hide caption

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Aaron Ross/Reuters

Homes destroyed by Cyclone Idai litter the riverbanks of Buzi district, Mozambique. Weather forecasters there say they do not have all the resources they need to cope with more extreme weather affecting the country as a result of climate change. Nichole Sobecki/VII for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki/VII for NPR

Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change In Mozambique

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Babies in their cribs at Lambano Sanctuary, a hospice for orphaned children with HIV in Gauteng, South Africa. Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images

A World Health Organization medic prepares a vaccination dose for a front-line aid worker earlier this year in the small town of Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. Four Ebola response workers were killed and six others injured in two attacks overnight — one in Mangina and the other in Biakato Mines. Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP hide caption

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Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP

French Defense Minister Florence Parly (left) and French Army Chief of Staff Gen. François Lecointre said Tuesday that two helicopters collided in midair and killed 13 French soldiers fighting Islamic extremists in Mali. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

Ronald Mutyaba, an auto mechanic, at his home in Kampala, Uganda. Mutyaba is HIV positive and has developed Karposi sarcoma, a type of cancer that often affects people with immune deficiencies. He is holding a bottle of the liquid morphine that nurses from the nonprofit group Hospice Africa have prescribed to help control the pain caused by his illlness. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

A Sip Of Morphine: Uganda's Old-School Solution To A Shortage Of Painkillers

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An employee walks past a power plant's electricity pylons in Lagos, Nigeria. Power shortages are particularly a problem for Nigeria's booming tech industry, which accounts for nearly 14% of the country's GDP. Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Musician and opposition candidate Bobi Wine holds a press conference, encouraging his "people power" supporters to continue wearing their trademark red berets in Kampala after the military banned them. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Bobi Wine Vs. Uganda's 'Dictator': It's 'Dangerous To Sit Down And Resign To Fate'

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