Consider This from NPR Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Consider This from NPR

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Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

Wisdom From The Top with Guy Raz NPR hide caption

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BONUS: Wisdom From The Top

This episode is from our friends at Wisdom From The Top.

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A 'Help Wanted' sign is posted beside Coronavirus safety guidelines in front of a restaurant in Los Angeles, California on May 28, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

A record 4.3 million workers in America quit their jobs in August.

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

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Cargo containers sit stacked on ships at the Port of Los Angeles, the nation's busiest container port, on October 15, 2021 in San Pedro, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Why The Global Supply Chain Is Still Clogged — And How To Fix It

Last week the White House announced a plan to help move the port of Los Angeles into 24/7 operating status. But that will only "open the gates" of the clogged global supply chain, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg told NPR on the NPR Politics Podcast.

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Mitchell Joseph Valdes Sosa, the director of the Cuban Neurosciences Center, gives a press conference about symptoms reported by U.S. and Canadian diplomats in 2016 and 2017, commonly referred to as the "Havana Syndrome," in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

Since 2016, a number of U.S. diplomats and federal employees have reported symptoms of a mysterious illness, the so-called Havana Syndrome.

Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

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Colin Powell, chairman of the US Joint Chief of Staff, makes a point about the entrenched Iraqi troops in Kuwait during a briefing at the Pentagon 23 January 1991, Washington, DC. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Colin Powell's Complicated Legacy

Colin Powell's life was marked by public service, first as a soldier in Vietnam and then eventually as President George W. Bush's secretary of state. By that time he had already held many prominent positions in government, including national security adviser and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He was the first African American to hold each of these roles.

Colin Powell's Complicated Legacy

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Demonstrators gather at the Glynn County courthouse during a court appearance by Gregory and Travis McMichael, two suspects in the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery, on June 4, 2020 in Brunswick, Georgia. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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The Trial For The Killing Of Ahmaud Arbery

One of the killings that sparked racial justice protests last year is again in the national spotlight, with a trial that begins this week in Brunswick, Ga. Three white men are accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man shot and killed as he was jogging down a residential street.

The Trial For The Killing Of Ahmaud Arbery

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NPR

BONUS: 'Nina' And 'Just Us' Offer Ways To Start A Conversation On Race

After the protests last year, we heard the phrase "racial reckoning" a lot, as some groups of people struggled to catch up with what's just been reality for many others. On this episode of NPR's new Book of the Day podcast, we've got two books that might help you reckon with that reckoning, in two different ways: Traci Todd and illustrator Christian Robinson's bright and powerful picture book biography Nina: A Story of Nina Simone and poet Claudia Rankine's Just Us: An American Conversation, in which she puts together poetry, essays and images to bring readers into an uncomfortable but necessary conversation about race.

BONUS: 'Nina' And 'Just Us' Offer Ways To Start A Conversation On Race

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North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures As Water Runs Short In The West

Large parts of the West have been hot and dry for so long that reservoirs are running low and some communities are mandating conservation. California is talking about a statewide mandate, too. Meanwhile, farmers are preparing to flood their fields to replenish aquifers, while ranchers are selling off parts of their herds and worried about feeding the rest.

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures As Water Runs Short In The West

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Women rights activists hold up signs as they gather in Washington, DC. to protest the new abortion law in Texas. While she was instrumental to the early abortion-rights movement, many in the crown may not have known the name Pat Maginnis. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

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Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, right, First Lady Zinash Tayachew, center, and Djibouti's President Ismail Omar Guelleh, left, attend Abiy's inauguration ceremony after he was sworn in for a second five-year term, in the capital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

Social Media Misinformation Stokes A Worsening Civil War In Ethiopia

Hate and division on Facebook are not just a problem in the U.S. That's one of the messages whistleblower Frances Haugen took to Congress last week, where she accused Facebook's algorithms of quote, "literally fanning ethnic violence in Ethiopia," a country that's endured nearly a year of civil war.

Social Media Misinformation Stokes A Worsening Civil War In Ethiopia

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