Pop NPR Music stories that discuss pop music.

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Yola Joseph Ross/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joseph Ross/Courtesy of the artist

Yola on World Cafe

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Stream Stromae's "Santé." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Stromae, 'Santé'

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PinkPantheress Brent McKeever/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brent McKeever/Courtesy of the artist

PinkPantheress reimagines garage music for a new generation

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"My music is where I'm able to release feelings and have fun with it," Wolf tells NPR. "I love for my shows to be a big party. So when I'm performing, if it's my release, I want it to be a release for other people." Alma Rosaz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alma Rosaz/Courtesy of the artist

In the third part of our series exploring crossover in pop music, we reexamine the so-called "Latin explosion" of the '90s: what it was supposed to be for audiences across the U.S., and what it actually came to represent. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Kacey Musgraves Adreienne Raquel/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Adreienne Raquel/Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves on World Cafe

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