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Bruce Springsteen Springsteen on Broadway, which will have its final date on Dec. 15, 2018. The show has been documented in a new film, to be released just after that final performance. Danny Clinch/Shore Fire Media hide caption

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Danny Clinch/Shore Fire Media

A photograph of jazz pianist James Reese Europe projected above the musicians performing Jason Moran's James Reese Europe and the Absence of Ruin. Camille Blake/courtesy of JazzFest Berlin hide caption

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Camille Blake/courtesy of JazzFest Berlin

Ernie Isley (left) of The Isley Brothers and Chuck D of Public Enemy met at Mr Musichead Gallery in Los Angeles to discuss their respective versions of "Fight the Power." Nickolai Hammar/NPR hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR

'Fight The Power': A Tale Of 2 Anthems (With The Same Name)

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East L.A.'s Whittier Boulevard in 2018, seen from inside a classic Chevy. Mandalit del Barco/NPR hide caption

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Mandalit del Barco/NPR

The Story Of 'Whittier Blvd.,' A Song And Place Where Latino Youth Found Each Other

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U.S. Navy CPO Graham Jackson, with tears of grief, plays "Goin' Home," from Dvorak's 'New World' Symphony, as President Franklin D. Roosevelt's body is carried from Warm Springs, Ga., where he died. Ed Clark/Life Picture Collection/Getty hide caption

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Ed Clark/Life Picture Collection/Getty

How The 'New World' Symphony Introduced American Music To Itself

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Aretha Franklin, pictured during a television appearance in January 1972, the same month in which the project Amazing Grace was recorded. ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images hide caption

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ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images