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Investigations

With meatpacking plants reducing processing capacity nationwide, U.S. hog farmers are bracing or an unprecedented crisis: the need to euthanize millions of pigs. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Millions Of Pigs Will Be Euthanized As Pandemic Cripples Meatpacking Plants

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Medical workers prepare to use a swab to administer a coronavirus test at a drive-through center on March 21 in Jericho, N.Y. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Despite Early Warnings, U.S. Took Months To Expand Swab Production For COVID-19 Test

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Lawmakers are asking the Treasury Department and the IRS how many deceased people have received a coronavirus relief check from the government — and what the solution is. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As part of a demonstration across from the White House on May 7, National Nurses United set out empty shoes for nurses who have died from COVID-19. The union is asking employers and the government to provide safe workplaces, including adequate staffing. Hospitals have been laying off and furloughing nurses due to lost revenue. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Hospitals Lose Revenue, More Than A Million Health Care Workers Lose Jobs

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A letter bearing the signature of President Trump was sent to people who received a coronavirus relief payment as part of the CARES Act. Some of those payments went into the bank accounts of dead people. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The IRS Sent Coronavirus Relief Payments To Dead People

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Navy medical and support personnel staff the USNS Mercy, but the hospital ship belongs to the Navy's Military Sealift Command and is run by a crew of civilian mariners. The ship headed to the Port of Los Angeles on March 23 in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Civilian Mariners Say Strict Navy Coronavirus Restrictions Are Unfair

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President Trump signs the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act last week. The law added billions for loans for small businesses through the PPP. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Loopholes In Small Business Relief Program Allow Thriving Companies To Cash In

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The Internal Revenue Service headquarters was photographed on April 27, 2020 in the Federal Triangle section of Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Coronavirus Payments To Poor Are Vulnerable To Fraud

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Emergency medical workers transport a patient at the Cobble Hill Health Center on April 18, 2020, in Brooklyn, New York. The nursing home has had at least 55 COVID-19 reported deaths. Justin Heiman/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Heiman/Getty Images

In New York Nursing Homes, Death Comes To Facilities With More People Of Color

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A Bank of America sign is displayed at a branch in New York on April 10, 2020. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Small Business Rescue Earned Banks $10 Billion In Fees

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Wayne LaPierre, CEO of the National Rifle Association, stands onstage during the NRA's annual meeting in Indianapolis on April 26, 2019. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Secret Recording Reveals NRA's Legal Troubles Have Cost The Organization $100 Million

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Sen. Richard Burr "has relatively lousy performance over the broad period," according to a Dartmouth professor who reviewed his trading history. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus pandemic in the Rose Garden of the White House on March 13. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Month After Emergency Declaration, Trump's Promises Largely Unfulfilled

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When Lex Frieden broke his hip, a Texas hospital decided against an operation. Frieden, a quadriplegic since 1967, would never walk, so the surgery wasn't necessary, the doctors reasoned, a decision that left him with lasting pain. Mack Taylor / Houston METRO hide caption

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Mack Taylor / Houston METRO

People With Disabilities Fear Pandemic Will Worsen Medical Biases

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Due to the coronavirus, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine has recommended suspending new treatments. Morsa Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Morsa Images/Getty Images

Women 'Falling Off The Cliff Of Fertility' As Pandemic Puts Treatments On Hold

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Glenn Fine, then acting inspector general at the Department of Defense, testifies during a 2017 Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. Fine was the defense department's acting inspector general until April 6, when President Trump replaced him. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In Another Pushback Against Oversight, Trump Removes Pandemic Inspector General

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A Pier 39 employee wears protective gear while cleaning a sidewalk in San Francisco, Calif., on March 16, the day the county announced a local shelter-in-place order. On March 19, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a shelter-in-place order for the entire state. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Want To See What Your City's Pandemic Plan Says? Good Luck.

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As hospitals consider how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting care, maternity wards across the country are changing policies on deliveries and visitors. Jasper Jacobs/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Jacobs/AFP via Getty Images

Pregnant Women Worry About Pandemic's Impact On Labor, Delivery And Babies

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Nurses check registration lists before testing patients for coronavirus at the University of Washington Medical Center on March 13 in Seattle. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, listens during a coronavirus briefing with health insurers at the White House on March 10. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pence Chief Of Staff Owns Stocks That Could Conflict With Coronavirus Response

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