Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

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Water utilities need quick ways to check for contamination in the drinking water supply, including from norovirus, which causes intestinal distress. Scientists are trying to make it easier to test for the virus. Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

A Speedy Test For Norovirus Could Help Water Supplies Check For Contamination

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Researchers looked for genetic variants linked to sexual behavior in new genetic research that analyzed DNA from donated blood samples from nearly half a million middle-aged people from Britain who participated in a project called UK Biobank. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Search For 'Gay Genes' Comes Up Short In Large New Study

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Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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Marijuana use is risky for teens and pregnant women and can be habit-forming, says the U.S. surgeon general. Jane Khomi/Getty Images hide caption

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Jane Khomi/Getty Images

Surgeon General Sounds Alarm On Risk Of Marijuana Addiction And Harm

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Before scheduling his hernia surgery, Wolfgang Balzer called the hospital, the surgeon and the anesthesiologist to get estimates for how much the procedure would cost. But when his bill came, the estimates he had obtained were wildly off. John Woike for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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John Woike for Kaiser Health News

Bill Of The Month: Estimate For Cost Of Hernia Surgery Misses The Mark

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A federal agency says Vermont Medical Center required a nurse to participate in an abortion over her moral objections. Lisa Rathke/AP hide caption

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Lisa Rathke/AP

State's attorney Brad Beckworth lays out one of his closing arguments in Oklahoma's case against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla. in July. The judge in the case ruled Monday that J&J must pay $572 million to the state. Chris Landsberger/AP hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/AP

Oklahoma Wanted $17 Billion To Fight Its Opioid Crisis: What's The Real Cost?

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Judge Thad Balkman ruled that Johnson & Johnson is responsible for fueling Oklahoma's opioid crisis. He announced his decision in Norman, Okla., Monday. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Johnson & Johnson Ordered To Pay Oklahoma $572 Million In Opioid Trial

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Among patients age 12 and older in a study of people with mild, persistent asthma, more than half did just as well, or better, on a placebo as they did on a steroid inhaler used twice per day to prevent symptoms. hsyncoban/Getty Images hide caption

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hsyncoban/Getty Images

Study Questions Mainstay Treatment For Mild Asthma

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Rows of guns for sale were on display at the Vernal Knife and Gun Show in northeastern Utah, where firearms are imbued in the culture. Erik Neumann/KUER hide caption

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Erik Neumann/KUER

In Rural Utah, Preventing Suicide Means Meeting Gun Owners Where They Are

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