Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

A thick layer of smoke from the Carr Fire settles over California's Central Valley in a view from a jet earlier this summer. Fine particulate matter from drifting wildfire smoke mixes with industrial ozone and can become trapped between the mountain ranges. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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A visitor to the Harvard School of Public Health's mock safe injection setup checks out the items on the demonstration table set up underneath a tent on the quad near the medical school in Boston on April 30, 2018. Jessica Rinaldi/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Getty Images

Justice Department Promises Crackdown On Supervised Injection Facilities

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Courtesy of G. P. Putnam's Sons

'Gross Anatomy' Turns Humor On Taboos About The Female Body

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Some research suggests that having multiples increases a parent's risk of mental health concerns — like depression and anxiety — before and after the children are born. Don't be afraid to admit it, parents advise. Emotional support can help. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

Wren Vetens fought to get her gender confirmation surgery covered after the Group Insurance Board's initial decision left her without insurance coverage. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source

A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

Chimps use sticks to poke into a mock termite mound to taste a sweet substance placed in the mound by keepers at Chimp Haven in Keithville, La. Today, caretakers say, more chimps in the U.S. live in accredited animal sanctuaries than in research facilities. Janet McConnaughey/AP hide caption

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Janet McConnaughey/AP

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps

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Panel: Doctors Should Focus On Preventing Depression In Pregnant Women, New Moms

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Without including a "control group" of sepsis patients who get the usual mix of drugs and fluids, even a big study comparing two other experimental approaches won't deliver helpful answers, critics say. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images/Getty Images

Critics Trying To Stop A Big Study Of Sepsis Say The Research Puts Patients At Risk

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An image of a rosehip neuron (top) and a connecting pyramidal cell (bottom). Tamas Lab/University of Szeged hide caption

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Tamas Lab/University of Szeged

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue

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Previous research has shown that babies in the first year of life understand that certain individuals tend to win in social conflicts — such as individuals that are physically larger, or that come from larger social groups. Rick Lowe/Getty Images hide caption

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Toddlers Like Winners, But How They Win Matters

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A researcher showed people a picture of The Thinker in an effort to study the link between analytical thinking and religious disbelief. In hindsight, the researcher called his study design "silly". The study could not be reproduced. Peter Barritt/Getty Images hide caption

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In Psychology And Other Social Sciences, Many Studies Fail The Reproducibility Test

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Life-Threatening Heart Attack Leaves Teacher With $108,951 Bill

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