Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

"As deductibles rise, patients have the right to know the price of health care services so they can shop around for the best deal," says Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and announced the Trump administration's plan this week. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Airway-irritating acetals seem to form in some types of vape juice even without heat, researchers find — likely a reaction between the alcohol and aldehydes in the liquid. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A rock of crystal methamphetamine lifted from a suspect in Orange County, Calif. This fall, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects to begin collecting more local information about the rising use of meth, cocaine and other stimulants. Leonard Ortiz/Getty Images hide caption

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Leonard Ortiz/Getty Images

Seizures Of Methamphetamine Are Surging In The U.S.

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It may plague your summer peaches and plums, but the fruit fly is "one of the most important animals" in medical research, says conservationist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images hide caption

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Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images

Bugged By Insects? 'Buzz, Sting, Bite' Makes The Case For 6-Legged Friends

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Gray was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when she was an infant. She was considering a bone marrow transplant when she heard about the CRISPR study and jumped at the chance to volunteer. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

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Altovise Ewing, who has a doctorate in human genetics and counseling, now works as a genetic counselor and researcher at 23andMe, one of the largest direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies, based in Mountain View, Calif. Karen Santos for NPR hide caption

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Karen Santos for NPR

Sovereign Valentine, a personal trainer in Plains, Mont., needs dialysis for his end-stage renal disease. When he first started dialysis treatments, Fresenius Kidney Care clinic in Missoula charged $13,867.74 per session, or about 59 times the $235 Medicare pays for a dialysis session. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

The mood boost of talking to strangers may seem fleeting, but the research on well-being, scientists say, suggests that a happy life is made up of a high frequency of positive events. Even small positive experiences — chatting with a stranger in an elevator — can make a difference. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Sleep scientists say the power of a warm bedtime bath to trigger sleepiness likely has to do, paradoxically, with cooling the body's core temperature. PhotoTalk/Getty Images hide caption

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Overall in medical research, the proportion of participants with non-European ancestry is only about 20 percent, says Columbia University bioethicist Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. And that's a problem. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images
Courtesy of Jeff Weiner/Allergan

Allergan Recalls Textured Breast Implants Linked To Rare Type Of Cancer

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University of Utah doctoral student Jacob George, left, and associate professor Greg Clark examine the LUKE arm that they use for their experiments. A man who lost his lower arm in an electrical accident was able to experience some sense of touch and fine motor control with his grip while using the experimental device. Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering hide caption

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Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering

Different parts of the brain aren't always in the same stage of sleep at the same time, notes neurologist and author Guy Leschziner. When this happens, an individual might order a pizza or go out for a drive — while technically still being fast asleep. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

From Insomnia To Sexsomnia, Unlocking The 'Secret World' Of Sleep

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In 2016, dozens of people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Havana began reporting symptoms of what became known as "Havana syndrome." Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba

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