Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Clara Hardy (middle) with her parents, Robert and Chrissy. Clara, who lives in North Carolina, needed expensive surgery and other procedures right after birth to save her life. The family's insurance policy paid most of the cost. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

GOP Health Bill Could Let Insurers Cap Spending On Expensive Patients

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Babies exposed to opioids in utero may experience withdrawal symptoms at birth, but these symptoms are treatable. Typically, the babies can go home after a few days or a couple weeks. Getty Images hide caption

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For Newborns Exposed To Opioids, Health Issues May Be The Least Of Their Problems

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Will My High Premiums Go Down? More Q&A About The GOP Health Plan

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Mammography has helped increase the early detection of breast tumors. Now, researchers say, the goal is to discern which of those tumors need aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation after surgery. Chicago Tribune/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/Getty Images

Tumor Test Helps Identify Which Breast Cancers Don't Require Extra Treatment

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Patients who underwent genetic screenings now fear that documentation of the results in their medical records could lead to problems if a new health law is enacted. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

Former bookkeeper Betty Redlin, 88, broke a hip a few years ago and was never able to walk again. She's on Medi-Cal, California's version of Medicaid. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Ina Jaffe/NPR

Nursing Homes Worry Proposed Medicaid Cuts Will Force Cuts, Closures

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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Less than half of the 22 million veterans in the U.S. get their health care through the Veterans Affairs system. Many rely on Medicaid, which is slated for reductions under the health plan making its way through the U.S. Senate. bwilking/Getty Images hide caption

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Veterans Helped By Obamacare Worry About Republican Repeal Efforts

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Calls for tort reform in regards to medical malpractice are popular on the campaign trail. But research shows that costs from medical liability make up just 2 to 2.5 percent of total health care spending in the U.S. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The ongoing debate over health care has many people wondering how changes will affect their coverage. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

Q&A: What Does The Senate Health Bill Mean For Me?

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San Francisco lactation counselor Caroline Kerhervé — with kids of her clients — during a weekly session of a new mothers' group she coached in May. Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve hide caption

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Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve

Medicaid pays the costs for about 62 percent of seniors who are living in nursing homes, some of the priciest health care available. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM hide caption

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Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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