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An illustration shows spiky antigens studding the virus's outer coat. Tests under development that look for these antigens might be faster than PCR tests for diagnosing COVID-19, proponents say. But the tests might still need PCR-test confirmation. Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns

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Preliminary results of a study of the antiviral drug remdesivir show it is effective in shortening the recovery time for patients with COVID-19. Gilead Sciences via AP hide caption

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Gilead Sciences via AP

A booth was taped off to ensure social distancing at a coffee shop in Woodstock, Ga., on Monday, as Gov. Brian Kemp eased restrictions in the state and allowed dine-in service. Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Compared With China, U.S. Stay-At-Home Has Been 'Giant Garden Party,' Journalist Says

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A medical worker transports a patient at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital, where doctors noticed that some young COVID-19 patients without other risk factors had strokes. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Doctors Link COVID-19 To Potentially Deadly Blood Clots And Strokes

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Doctors are urging parents to keep all their child's vaccinations up to date — now, more than ever. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Don't Skip Your Child's Well Check: Delays In Vaccines Could Add Up To Big Problems

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Anna Davis Abel, a graduate student studying creative writing at West Virginia University, couldn't get tested for COVID-19 until her doctor ruled out other possible illnesses. Rebecca Kiger for KHN hide caption

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Rebecca Kiger for KHN

COVID-19 Tests That Are Supposed To Be Free Can Ring Up Surprising Charges

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A project in San Francisco to estimate spread of the coronavirus in hard-hit neighborhoods has expanded testing to everyone over age 4 in a broad swath of the Mission District this week, including at a pop-up site at Garfield Square. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

San Francisco Enlists A Key Latino Neighborhood In Coronavirus Testing

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Despite recent changes in insurance policy, some patients say doctors and insurers are charging them upfront for video appointments and phone calls — not just copays but sometimes the entire cost of the visit, even if it's covered by insurance. sesame/Getty Images hide caption

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sesame/Getty Images

South Carolina has permitted retail stores to reopen to customers. It's one of a handful of states easing up on some social distancing restrictions. Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Only 28% of the factories that make active ingredients for pharmaceuticals for the domestic market are located in the U.S., according to the Food and Drug Administration. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A pathologist holds a vial from a COVID-19 test kit. Various bottlenecks in the U.S. that have constrained widespread testing for the coronavirus were problems in February and persist today. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why The Warning That Coronavirus Was On The Move In U.S. Cities Came So Late

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A fatigued health care worker takes a moment outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in April. Many hospital workers these days have to cope with horrific tragedies playing out multiple times on a single, 12-hour shift. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Trauma On The Pandemic's Front Line Leaves Health Workers Reeling

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A health care worker holds a swab used for COVID-19 testing at the ProHEALTH testing site in Jericho, N.Y., March 24, 2020. Steve Pfost/Newsday RM via Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Pfost/Newsday RM via Getty Images