Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

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After a lifetime of agricultural work on the U.S. mainland, Ausberto Maldonado retired home to a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. But he has diabetes, and especially since Hurricane Maria, has been struggling to get by. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Time's Running Out For Many Frail, Older People In Puerto Rico

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A document developed by a New York end-of-life agency permits people who want to avoid the ravages of advanced dementia to make their final wishes known — while they still have the ability to do so. One version requests that all food and fluids be withheld under certain circumstances. Skynesher/Getty Images hide caption

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Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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Velva Poole works to reunite children with parents who have been grappling with substance use disorder. Mentoring the parents, she says, is a big part of the state-sponsored program's success. Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media hide caption

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Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media

Opioid Treatment Program Helps Keep Families Together

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The author of a new book, Doing Harm, argues that a pattern of gender bias in medicine means women's pain may be going undiagnosed. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

How 'Bad Medicine' Dismisses And Misdiagnoses Women's Symptoms

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A telemedicine program in Rochester, Minn., allows low-risk expectant mothers to forgo some standard prenatal visits. Mike Harrington/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Harrington/Getty Images
Paige Vickers for NPR

Birth Control Apps Find A Big Market In 'Contraception Deserts'

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Dr. Garen Wintemute at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, says of the new authority given to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "There's no funding. There's no agreement to provide funding. There isn't even encouragement." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

When patients connect online, they often share information that reveals how treatments work in the real world. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Dr. Carla Rossotti (left), a general practitioner, and her health care team leave the home of the their patient, 37-year-old Osvaldo Daniel Martinez. He has the symptoms of a degenerative disease, Rossotti says, but he needs a neurologist's evaluation before he can get proper treatment. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

For One Father And Son In Puerto Rico, A Storm Was Just The Latest Trial

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Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine (center), is joined on Wednesday by Sen. Lindsey Graham (from left), R-S.C., Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Collins was pushing for provisions in the budget bill aimed at lowering premiums for people purchasing health insurance in the Affordable Care Act's marketplaces. That didn't happen. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP