Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Celeste Thompson, 57, a home care worker in Missoula, Mont., examines a pill bottle in her home. Thompson cares for her husband, and worries that if she loses her Medicaid coverage she won't be able to afford to see a doctor. Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin is working with Congress to renew the Veterans Choice program, which allows some veterans to get medical care outside the VA system, and provides money for medical staff. Marian Carrasquero /NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero /NPR

'The VA Is On A Path Toward Recovery,' Secretary Of Veterans Affairs Says

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Robin Utz at her home in St. Louis, Mo. Carolina Hidalgo/KWMU hide caption

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Carolina Hidalgo/KWMU

Missouri Rejects Federal Money In Order To Set Up Its Own Abortion Restrictions

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U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price speaks during the White House daily press briefing March 7, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. Secretary Price answered questions on the new healthcare bill during the briefing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Bill Kochevar received an implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating system that allowed him to move limbs he hadn't been able to move in eight years. Cleveland FES Center hide caption

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Cleveland FES Center

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says there is not enough evidence to determine whether testing people with no symptoms of celiac disease provides any benefit for those patients. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

No Need To Get Screened For Celiac Unless You Have Symptoms, Panel Says

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State and federal policies now limit the use of lead in gasoline, paint and plumbing, but children can still ingest the metal through contaminated soil. The effects of even fairly small amounts can be long-lasting, the evidence suggests. Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Childhood Exposure To Lead Can Blunt IQ For Decades, Study Suggests

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Kathleen helps her son Gideon get his glasses on. Part of Gideon's brain was damaged during development, which effects his vision. Caitlin O'Hara for NPR hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara for NPR

For Gideon, Infection With a Common Virus Caused Rare Birth Defects

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Yalieth Gonzalez and her baby Micaela Delgado at the Maternal Infant Studies Center at the University of Puerto Rico. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Living With Zika In Puerto Rico Means Watching, Waiting And Fearing Judgment

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