Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case

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"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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Dr. Dorry Segev (right), of Johns Hopkins Medicine, led the team of doctors that transplanted an HIV-positive liver and kidney into two different HIV-positive patients this month. Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Medicine

New Source Of Transplant Organs For Patients With HIV: Others With HIV

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Fatty plaque (shown here in yellow) blocks about 60 percent of this coronary artery's width. The increasing thickness of artery walls is just one factor that can increase vulnerability to a heart attack or stroke. Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source hide caption

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Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source

Possible Heart Benefits Of Taking Estrogen Get Another Look

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Vacharkulksemsuk et al. /PNAS

To Catch Someone On Tinder, Stretch Your Arms Wide

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An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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Paul Hornback was a senior engineer and analyst for the U.S. Army when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago at age 55. His wife, Sarah, had to retire 18 months ago to care for him full time. Courtesy of the Hornbeck family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Hornbeck family

Big Financial Costs Are Part Of Alzheimer's Toll On Families

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Natalie Wilson/Flickr State/Getty Images

'Girls & Sex' And The Importance Of Talking To Young Women About Pleasure

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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

A Crisis With Scant Data: States Move To Count Drug-Dependent Babies

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Harvoni can cure hepatitis C, but the drug costs a fortune. Are loans to patients the answer? Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Amanda Hensley with her daughter, Valencia. Hensley says several hospitals and clinics she contacted were reluctant to help her quit her opioid habit. "Nobody wants to touch a pregnant woman with an addiction issue." Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Pregnant And Addicted: The Tough Road To Family Health

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Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

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Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare

To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role

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