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Dr. Nayna Patel performs an ultrasound exam on Rinku Macwan, at a hospital near Ahmedabad, India. It's illegal in India for doctors to reveal a baby's sex during these exams, but many do it anyway. Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images

A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds no link between the number of vaccinations a young child receives and the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

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Taxes this year will be as much of a drag as ever. But not because of the Affordable Care Act. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Obamacare Won't Affect Most 2012 Taxes, Despite Firm's Claim

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David Oliver sits quietly as he waits for the results of a scan at Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., in 2012. The University of Missouri research professor was diagnosed with cancer in September 2011. He broke the news to colleagues via a video on the Internet. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Particles of the hepatitis C virus are imaged with an electron microscope. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

A microscopic image of prostate cancer. Researchers have found new genetic markers that flag a person's susceptibility to the disease, as well as breast and ovarian cancer. Otis Brawley /National Cancer Institute hide caption

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Otis Brawley /National Cancer Institute

Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine

Chick-Fil-A employees Jennifer Cummins, right, and Joshua Figaretti work out in the gym during lunch at the company's corporate headquarters office in Hapeville, Ga. Increasingly employers are offering health plan incentives to encourage healthy behaviors from workers. Ric Feld/AP hide caption

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Ric Feld/AP

A micrograph of HeLa cells, derived from cervical cancer cells taken from Henrietta Lacks. Tomasz Szul/Visuals Unlimited, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tomasz Szul/Visuals Unlimited, Inc./Getty Images

People who are socially isolated may be at a greater risk of dying sooner, a British study suggests. But do Facebook friends count? How about texting? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe speaks at a rally promoting the expansion of Medicaid in the state in front of the Capitol in Little Rock on March 7. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP