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A combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella protects kids against all three illnesses with one shot. Courtney Perry/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Perry/The Washington Post/Getty Images

States Move To Restrict Parents' Refusal To Vaccinate Their Kids

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Abortion-rights activists gathered for a news conference in New York City Monday to protest the Trump administration's proposed restrictions on family planning providers. The rule would force any medical provider receiving federal assistance to refuse to promote, refer for, perform or support abortion as a method of family planning. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In their classic radio show, Car Talk, hosts Ray and Tom Magliozzi, demonstrated what some doctors consider an ideal example of the thinking doctors need to learn to make a good medical diagnosis. Liz Linder/WBUR hide caption

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Liz Linder/WBUR

The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

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Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Jeannette Parker, an animal-loving biologist, stopped to feed a stray cat in a rural area outside Florida's Everglades National Park. Instead of showing appreciation, the cat bit her. Angel Valentín for KHN hide caption

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Angel Valentín for KHN

Cat Bites The Hand That Feeds; Hospital Bills $48,512

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A child takes in the sights under blooming Japanese cherry trees at the Bispebjerg Cemetery in Copenhagen, Denmark. Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images

Leah Steimel (center) says she would consider buying insurance through a Medicaid-style plan that the New Mexico Legislature is considering. Her family includes (from left) her husband, Wellington Guzman; their daughter, Amelia; and sons Daniel and Jonathan. Courtesy of Leah Steimel hide caption

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Courtesy of Leah Steimel
Ariel Davis for NPR

Anger Can Be Contagious — Here's How To Stop The Spread

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Sen. Estes Kefauver, D-Tenn., (left) and Sen. Everett Dirksen, R-Ill., (second from left) clashed at the reopening of a Senate drug investigation in 1960 over whether witnesses could be forced to reveal business secrets while testifying. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Some patients have started to seek out an oral treatment for food allergies that's not yet widely offered by clinicians. Cat Gwynn/Getty Images hide caption

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Cat Gwynn/Getty Images

CVS plans to transform some of its stores into "health hubs," retail locations revamped to include more health care services and products. One of the first is in Spring, Texas, a suburb of Houston. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

CVS Looks To Make Its Drugstores A Destination For Health Care

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Thirty-three-year-old mother Kim Nelson started a vaccine advocacy group in Greenville, S.C., to help reach vaccine-hesitant families. Here, she prepares vaccine information flyers for public school students. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

A Parent-To-Parent Campaign To Get Vaccine Rates Up

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