Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, appeared before the House Oversight Committee during a contentious hearing on drug pricing on Feb. 4, 2016. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Dr. Angela Gatzke-Plamann is the only full-time physician in Necedah, Wis., and the only physician in Juneau County, Wis., who has the required training to prescribe the addiction medicine buprenorphine. Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Watch for NPR hide caption

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Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Watch for NPR

In Rural Areas Without Pain Or Addiction Specialists, Family Doctors Fill In The Gaps

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An image of Ow Luen from his file, originally held at the USCIS, now available at the National Archives. Grant Din/National Archives hide caption

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Grant Din/National Archives

Tracing Your Family's Roots May Soon Get A Lot More Expensive

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Placenta purveyors often dehydrate and grind a new mother's placenta to a powder, then add it to a pill capsule. Generally, the goal is to increase her milk production, energy and mood, but scientists dispute such benefits. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Eliza Oliver helps her daughter, Taelyn, step down from the exam table after a wellness check at the Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas in Fort Scott, Kan. The child's doctor now has a medical scribe to takes notes. The visit this time seemed more "personal," Oliver says. Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News

1 Year After Losing Its Hospital, A Rural Town Is Determined To Survive

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Victoria Gray, who has sickle cell disease, volunteered for one of the most anticipated medical experiments in decades: the first attempt to use the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the United States. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Young Mississippi Woman's Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment

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Nancy Gustafson (right), an opera singer, used singing to reconnect with her mother, Susan Gustafson, who had dementia and was barely talking. She says her mom started joking and laughing with her again after they sang together. Emily Becker/Songs by Heart hide caption

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Emily Becker/Songs by Heart

A horn player (left) in this detail from a 1694 altar carving by Francesco Antonio d'Alberto in Piedmont, Italy, clearly has a swollen neck that signifies goiter, medical historians say. The thyroid condition was a sign of poverty in those days. Renzo Dionigi hide caption

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Renzo Dionigi

Why Certain Poor Shepherds In Nativity Scenes Have Huge, Misshapen Throats

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Congress is trying to crack down on teenagers and young adults using tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

Why Tobacco Industry Giants Backed Raising The Minimum Age Of Purchase

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When Alexa Kasdan's sore throat lingered for more than a week, she went to her doctor. The doctor sent her throat swab and blood draw to an out-of-network lab for sophisticated DNA tests, resulting in a $28,395.50 bill. Shelby Knowles for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for Kaiser Health News

For Her Head Cold, Insurer Coughed Up $25,865

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An old problem has a potential new solution: Using psilocybin has helped patients quit smoking in a clinical trial. Xakhr Chay Tha Man / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Xakhr Chay Tha Man / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Water applied to cutting equipment, like this computer-operated saw, is one method to control silica dust exposure when cutting quartz slabs. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP