Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.
Hokyoung Kim for NPR and KHN

When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/777295848/783762521" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A box of vaping products confiscated from students or thrown away at Boulder High School. The school's assistant principal collects items for later delivery to the county's hazardous waste facility. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
John Daley/Colorado Public Radio

Don't Toss That E-Cig: Vaping Waste Is A Whole New Headache For Schools and Cities

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780865248/784122217" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Years ago, Portia Smith (center) was afraid to seek care for her postpartum depression because she feared child welfare involvement. She and her daughters Shanell Smith (right), 19, and Najai Jones Smith (left), 15, pose for a selfie in February after makeup artist Najai made up everyone as they were getting ready at home to go to a movie together. Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer

Black Mothers Get Less Treatment For Their Postpartum Depression

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760231688/783681063" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

We're tethered to our brothers and sisters as adults far longer than we are as children; our sibling relationships, in fact, are the longest-lasting family ties we have. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Jennifer Brooks, who had repeatedly visited the emergency room at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, was sued by Southeastern Emergency Physicians for $8,500 in unpaid medical bills. Andrea Morales/MLK50 hide caption

toggle caption
Andrea Morales/MLK50

The MX908 can check for the presence of fentanyl mixed with other drugs and such testing may help prevent overdoses. Sarah Mackin of the Boston Public Health Commission prepares the machine for testing some samples. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Built For Counterterrorism, This High-Tech Machine Is Now Helping Fight Fentanyl

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780794194/783237362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A food allergy, sensitivity, or intolerance can make the difference between passing the mashed potatoes — and passing on them. JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Kaydee Edralin and her husband, along with many other students at Brigham Young University-Idaho were upset they would have to buy additional health insurance after the university said it would not consider Medicaid to be valid insurance. The school reversed the policy Monday. James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio

Reversing Course, Idaho Campus Lets Students Use Medicaid As Health Coverage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/782766331/783076039" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lucy Branson, now 4, holds Polly Pocket shoes like the ones she put in her nose. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/KHN

Nothing To Sneeze At: $2,659 Bill To Pluck Doll's Shoe From Girl's Nose

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/782889808/787548346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Matthew Braun, a first-year medical student at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Wash., says his personal history with opioids will help him care for patients. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Medical Students Say Their Opioid Experiences Will Shape How They Prescribe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776796506/782867320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lawmakers in the Texas Legislature passed a law intended to protect consumers against surprise medical bills, but loopholes may weaken it before it is enacted. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Law To Protect Patients Against Surprise Medical Bills In Texas Proves Hard To Enact

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/782573139/782867314" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eating fish can protect against heart disease but many people don't eat enough to be effective. In November, an FDA panel recommended broader use of a prescription-strength fish oil drug Vascepa for people at higher risk of heart disease. Enn Li Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Enn Li Photography/Getty Images

For Your Heart, Eat Fish Or Take Pills? Now There's A Drug Equal To 8 Salmon Servings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/781195172/782537045" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Being overweight or obese can diminish the effectiveness of a flu shot, researchers say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Excess Weight Can Weaken The Flu Shot

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/782079520/782537051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Geriatric oncologist Supriya Gupta Mohile meets with patient Jim Mulcahy at Highland Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. "If I didn't do a geriatric assessment and just looked at a patient I wouldn't have the same information," she says. Mike Bradley for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Bradley for NPR