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The Food and Drug Administration has seen a sharp increase in applications for drug to treat rare diseases. An oversight report found problems with how agency is handling them. Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

MRI scans before and after a season of football showed brain changes in a study of high school players. groveb/Getty Images hide caption

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The Trump administration said Thursday it wants states to innovate in ways that could produce more lower-cost health insurance options — even if those alternatives do not provide the same level of financial or medical coverage as an ACA plan. Getty Images hide caption

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Kristen Philman first tried methamphetamine in her early 20s, as an alternative to heroin and other opioids. When she discovered she was pregnant, she says, it was a wake-up call, and she did what she needed to do to stop using all those drugs. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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Theo Stroomer for NPR

Another Drug Crisis: Methamphetamine Use By Pregnant Women

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In experiments involving people with epilepsy, targeted zaps of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex region of the brain helped ease depressive symptoms. Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

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Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Researchers zeroed in on the ages of kids when they enrolled in kindergarten to investigate discrepancies in ADHD diagnoses. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Youngest Children In A Class Are Most Likely To Get ADHD Diagnosis

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Sakran, a Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon, created the Twitter account @ThisIsOurLane and encouraged other doctors to share their experiences treating victims of gun violence. Courtesy of Joseph Sakran hide caption

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Courtesy of Joseph Sakran

A Trauma Surgeon Who Survived Gun Violence Is Taking On The NRA

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Affordable Care Act navigator Nini Hadwen (right) helped Jorge Hernandez (left) and Marta Aguirre find a plan on the health insurance exchange in Miami in 2013. Today, with fewer navigators, much of that counseling is done by phone instead of in person. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

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Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

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Tianjin, in northern China, is home to Tianjin University, an international research center that recently hired an American to lead its school of pharmaceutical science and technology. He recruits students from all over the world, he says, and the program's classes are taught in English. Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students

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Dr. Kimberly Remski was told by a potential employer that she couldn't provide abortions during her free time, something she felt called to do. "I realized it was something I really needed to do," she says. Kim Kovacik for NPR hide caption

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Kim Kovacik for NPR

Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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