Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Chalfonte LeNee Queen of San Diego grappled with violent vomiting episodes for 17 years until she found out her illness was related to her marijuana use. Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline hide caption

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Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline

Rare And Mysterious Vomiting Illness Linked To Heavy Marijuana Use

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Alejandra Borunda, sits with her two children, Natalia, 11, and Raul, 8, holding the family dog at their home in Aurora, Colo. Borunda's children are among those who would lose out if the CHIP program isn't funded. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

States Sound Warning That Kids' Health Insurance Is At Risk

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A coalition of mental health advocacy groups is calling on federal regulators, state agencies and employers to conduct random audits of insurers to make sure they are in compliance with the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

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Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Christina Arenas reviews her medical bills at home in Washington, D.C. She complained about a mammogram and ultrasounds that she felt were unnecessary and sought a refund. Allison Shelley hide caption

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Allison Shelley

Epidemic Of Health Care Waste: From $1,877 Ear Piercing To ICU Overuse

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When young people turn 18, they typically sign their own paperwork before receiving medical care that says they will pay what the insurer doesn't cover. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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Donnal Walker, 52, returned home to find his HIV pills floating in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey. He went 11 days without medication. Sarah Varney/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Varney/KHN

If you're regularly checking your phone at night in a dark room, you're probably tricking your body into thinking it's still daytime. Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Apps Can Cut Blue Light From Devices, But Do They Help You Sleep?

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