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During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

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Fultz et al. 2019

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins

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Arline Feilen (left) and her sister, Kathy McCoy, at their mother's home in the Chicago suburbs. The biggest chunk of Feilen's bill was $16,480 for four nights in a room shared with another patient. McCoy joked that it would have been cheaper to stay at the Ritz-Carlton. Alyssa Schukar for KHN hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for KHN

A Woman's Grief Led To A Mental Health Crisis And A $21,634 Hospital Bill

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Vanderbilt University professor John Geer sits for a video-taped deposition in 2014, defending his expert witness report which backed up the tobacco industry position that smokers knew of the health risks of smoking as early as the mid-1950s. Academics often provide testimony for the industry. Kenneth Byrd hide caption

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Kenneth Byrd

Some Academics Quietly Take Side Jobs Helping Tobacco Companies In Court

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Sarah Zuger, who has Type 1 diabetes, with her children, Elsie and Liam, at their home in Munhall, Pa. Liam tested positive for antibodies that indicate high risk for developing Type 1 diabetes. Ross Mantle for NPR hide caption

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Ross Mantle for NPR

Outside of risks from the fire's heat — and any health risks related to a long-term power outage — the main health concern in wildfire conditions is smoke, which produces particulate matter that can penetrate deep into the lungs, increasing the risk of respiratory diseases and asthma, as well as heart problems. Anna Maria Barry-Jester/KHN hide caption

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Anna Maria Barry-Jester/KHN

Kevin Wilson's previous books include The Family Fang, Perfect Little World and Baby, You're Gonna Be Mine. Leigh Anne Couch/Ecco hide caption

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Leigh Anne Couch/Ecco

For Author Kevin Wilson, Writing Offers A Brief Reprieve From Tourette's

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Nathaly Sweeney, a neonatologist at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego and researcher with Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine, attends to a young patient in the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit. Jenny Siegwart/Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine hide caption

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Jenny Siegwart/Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine

Fast DNA Sequencing Can Offer Diagnostic Clues When Newborns Need Intensive Care

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More Americans have been getting less than seven hours of sleep a night in the past several years, especially in professions such as health care. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

Working Americans Are Getting Less Sleep, Especially Those Who Save Our Lives

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Scientists caution that using marijuana during pregnancy could be risky, but some women with severe nausea and lack of appetite during pregnancy are trying it. Niklas Skur/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Niklas Skur/EyeEm/Getty Images

Some Pregnant Women Use Weed For Morning Sickness But FDA Cautions Against It

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A flyer reminding customers about vaping-related deaths and illnesses, on display in a Seattle vape store. The Washington State Board of Health recently passed a four-month emergency ban on flavored vaping products. It applies to products that contain either THC or nicotine. Jovelle Tamayo/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks

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If you get to look at dogs and hug them every day, you just might live longer than people who don't have to clean animal hair off their clothes, according to a pair of studies out this month. R A Kearton/Getty Images hide caption

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R A Kearton/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta has mobilized more than 140 scientists and other staffers to investigate the causes of vaping-related lung injuries and deaths. Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source hide caption

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Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source

Behind The Scenes Of CDC's Vaping Investigation

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This year the Drug Enforcement Administration is accepting electronic vaping devices (provided any lithium ion batteries are removed) during its annual National Prescription Drug Take Back Day event. Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images