Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

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Open enrollment for 2019 health plans begins Nov. 1 on HealthCare.gov and on most state insurance exchanges. Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR

Looking For ACA Health Insurance For 2019? Here's What To Expect

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Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Grant Burningham, who lives in Bountiful, Utah, worked to get a referendum on Medicaid expansion on the Utah ballot in November. Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

Voters In 4 States Set To Decide On Medicaid Expansion

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"Democrats call it 'Medicare-for-all' because it sounds good, but in reality, it actually ends Medicare in its current form," Speaker of the House Paul Ryan asserted in a speech at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Evelyn Marie Vukadinovich is swabbed with a gauze pad immediately after being born by cesarean section at Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Doctors Test Bacterial Smear After Cesarean Sections To Bolster Babies' Microbiomes

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A Philadelphia police officer holds a package of the overdose antidote naloxone while on patrol in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia in April 2017. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Opioid Antidote Can Save Lives, But Deciding When To Use It Can Be Challenging

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Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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Social worker Lauren Rainbow (right) meets a man illegally camped in the woods in Snohomish County. A new program in the county helps people with addiction, instead of arresting them. Leah Nash for Finding Fixes podcast hide caption

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Leah Nash for Finding Fixes podcast

A Rural Community Decided To Treat Its Opioid Problem Like A Natural Disaster

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Shelton Allwood joined other demonstrators in Miami last year calling for continued protection for people who have pre-existing medical conditions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Connor Webb and his mother, Kim Webb, stand outside of their home in Huntington Beach, Calif. Connor was treated for a rare cancer at 16. He's well now but his mother is fighting for new cures in case the cancer comes back. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

President Trump announces a plan to overhaul how Medicare pays for certain drugs during a Thursday speech at the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A drug specialist in the Mexican army shows crystal methamphetamine paste seized at a clandestine laboratory in Mexico's Baja California in August. Much of the meth sold in the U.S. today comes from Mexico, according to DEA officials. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Methamphetamine Roils Rural Towns Again Across The U.S.

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The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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