Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program. Eric Mennel/WUNC hide caption

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Eric Mennel/WUNC

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

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Women participate in a breast cancer fund-raising in Denver in 2011. Despite decades of awareness campaigns, the survival rate for women with metastatic breast cancer hasn't improved. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post/AP hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post/AP

Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries

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Examples of what the iPhone app looks for: The white reflection from an otherwise dark pupil can indicate a tumor, a cataract or other eye problems. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

Look Here: Phone App Checks Photos For Eye Disease

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Don't look for leading Ebola researchers at the Sheraton New Orleans. Louisiana health officials told doctors and scientists who have been in West Africa not to come to a medical meeting in town. Prayitno/Flickr hide caption

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Prayitno/Flickr

Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

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A man wears a protective mask as he carries a bouquet of flowers at Women's College Hospital in Toronto in March 2003, when SARS fears about were widespread. Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/AP

Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrived by ambulance at Emory University Hospital on Oct. 15. Now healthy, Vinson was discharged from the hospital Tuesday. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Emory Hospital Shares Lessons Learned On Ebola Care

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Home health care workers Jasmine Almodovar (far right) and Artheta Peters (center) take part in a Cleveland rally for higher pay on Sept. 4. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN, Ideastream hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN, Ideastream

Home Health Workers Struggle For Better Pay And Health Insurance

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Magnified 25,000 times, this digitally colorized scanning electron micrograph shows Ebola virus particles (green) budding from an infected cell (blue). CDC/NIAD hide caption

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CDC/NIAD

Blood Test For Ebola Doesn't Catch Infection Early

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