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Middle Palaeolithic artifacts recently excavated from Attirampakkam, an archaeological site in present-day southern India. The artifacts suggest the technique used to make them spread across the world long before researchers previously thought. Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature hide caption

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Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature

Scientists zeroed in on specific neurons in the brains of mice to gain insights into how anxiety is triggered and suppressed. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Researchers Discover 'Anxiety Cells' In The Brain

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Brenda Fitzgerald, Georgia Department of Public Health commissioner, and Gov. Nathan Deal respond to questions about Ebola victims at Emory University Hospital and efforts to screen for Ebola in 2014. A report in Politico revealed documents showing several new investments, including in a tobacco company, by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Brenda Fitzgerald. David Tulis/AP hide caption

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David Tulis/AP

(From left) Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase; Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway; and Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, are creating health care venture, but details are scarce. (From left) Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Andy Kropa/Invision/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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(From left) Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Andy Kropa/Invision/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Patients with a history of polyps who need more subsequent tests may have to pick up some of those costs. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Critics say Idaho's insurance department can't unilaterally ignore federal law, including some of the Affordable Care Act's protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Otto Kitsinger/AP hide caption

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Otto Kitsinger/AP

A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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When Jenna Sauter's youngest son, Axel, tested positive for THC — marijuana's active ingredient — after he was born, she got a home visit from local social services. Sauter says she and her friends don't smoke near their children. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Is Smoking Pot While Pregnant Safe For The Baby?

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Sara's nephew and Wendy's son Benny painted this image of a heart that hangs in the author's home. Benny Tsabba/Wendy Wolfson for NPR hide caption

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Benny Tsabba/Wendy Wolfson for NPR

The revelation that a favorite uncle had died from a long-hidden drug habit shook Dr. Andrey Ostrovsky to his core. Last month Ostrovksy quit his job as Medicaid's chief medical officer and joined a group that's working to dispel the shame of addiction. Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images

Philip Morris' iQOS device heats tobacco but stops short of burning it, an approach the company says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. Philip Morris via AP hide caption

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Philip Morris via AP

FDA Panel Gives Qualified Support To Claims For 'Safer' Smoking Device

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Evangelina Padilla-Vaccaro, now cured of a serious genetic illness — thanks to a successful stem cell treatment — playing recently in a public park. The bubble around her is just for fun. Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro hide caption

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Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro