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Iowa state Rep. Joe Mitchell was first elected at age 21 and is now the co-founder of an organization looking to recruit fellow young conservatives to seek public office. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Snapchat is adding a feature to help young users run for political office

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Texas state senators are gathered in the Senate chamber on the first day of the 87th Legislature's third special session at the State Capitol on September 20, 2021 in Austin, Texas. Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem speaks during the Family Leadership Summit on July 16 in Des Moines, Iowa. Questions are floating around whether Noem had anything to do with the forced retirement of a state official after Noem's daughter was denied a real estate appraiser's license. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Sen. Chuck Grassley during a news conference last week following a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. Grassley is the ranking member of that committee. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat running for a second term, answers questions from the media after touring Whole Woman's Health of Charlottesville on Sept. 9. He's working to rally voters in response to Texas' restrictive new abortion law. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Far From Texas, The Virginia Governor's Race Will Test How Abortion Motivates Voters

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Republican conservative radio show host Larry Elder argues with a TV reporter in an interview Monday after visiting Philippe the Original deli during the campaign for the California gubernatorial recall election in Los Angeles. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

A Right-Wing Media Outfit Powers Larry Elder's Bid For California Governor

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses reporters Tuesday at the John L. Burton California Democratic Party headquarters in Sacramento after beating back the recall attempt that aimed to remove him from office. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Gov. Newsom Keeps His Seat As A Majority Of California Voters Reject The Recall

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Former President Donald Trump, seen here Saturday, has made unfounded claims about fraud affecting the California gubernatorial recall election. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Officials Fear A New Normal As Republicans Make Baseless California Fraud Claims

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In 2020, Raúl Ureña won a seat on the Calexico, Calif., City Council with a progressive grassroots campaign. But political shifts along the state's southern border offer some warning signs for Democrats that could spell trouble for Gov. Gavin Newsom in next week's recall election. Guy Marzorati/KQED hide caption

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Guy Marzorati/KQED

Georgia voters at an Atlanta polling place during the January runoff elections for two U.S. Senate seats. Election officials in the state say new laws and disinformation have made their jobs difficult. Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images

2020 Was Tough But Georgia Election Officials Say Future Elections Won't Be Easier

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Supporters of Mesa County clerk Tina Peters appear at a rally for her last month in Grand Junction, Colo. Peters is under investigation over the unauthorized release of sensitive information about voting equipment. Stina Sieg/CPR News hide caption

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Stina Sieg/CPR News

Voting Data From A Colorado County Was Leaked Online. Now The Clerk Is In Hiding

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A Utah poll worker checks a voter ID during the 2016 presidential election. Eleven states have strict voter ID laws, while 24 have less stringent laws for an ID to vote. Democrats have begun to lower their resistance to the issue. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrats Are Now Open To New Voter ID Rules. It Probably Won't Win Over The GOP

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Nine lawyers, including Sidney Powell, pictured in December, allied with former President Donald Trump face financial penalties and other sanctions after a judge said they had abused the court system to undermine the 2020 election. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Civil rights leader Ben Jealous speaks at a voting rights rally outside the White House on Tuesday, ahead of a House vote to advance a bill named for the late Rep. John Lewis. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Then-President Donald Trump elbow bumps Herschel Walker during a 2020 campaign rally in Atlanta. Walker filed paperwork Tuesday to run for U.S. Senate in the key swing state of Georgia. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Trump Ally Herschel Walker Is Running For U.S. Senate In Georgia

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Voters cast their midterm ballots on Nov. 6, 2018, at Briles Schoolhouse in Peoria Township, Kan. Whitney Curtis/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

New Laws Have Basically Ended Voter Registration Drives In Some Parts Of The U.S.

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