Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Pirette McKamey has spent more than three decades as an educator. Currently the principal at Mission High School in San Francisco, McKamey says being an anti-racist educator means committing to "all of the students sitting in front of me, including Black and Latinx students." Charles Warren hide caption

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Charles Warren

Veteran Educator On The Endless But 'Joyful' Work Of Creating Anti-Racist Education

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Columbia University President On New ICE Regulations Regarding International Students

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School buses sit idle in a Seattle bus yard. On July 2, Seattle Public Schools announced it is planning to resume some in-person learning in the new school year. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

When It Comes To Reopening Schools, 'The Devil's In The Details,' Educators Say

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Black Students Matter demonstrators march en route to a rally at the Department of Education in Washington, D.C., on June 19. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Effective Anti-Racist Education Requires More Diverse Teachers, More Training

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Massachusetts Attorney General On New ICE Regulation Regarding International Students

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Jane Elliott, an educator and anti-racism activist, first conducted her blue eyes/brown eyes exercise in her third-grade classroom in Iowa in 1968. Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

We Are Repeating The Discrimination Experiment Every Day, Says Educator Jane Elliott

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The president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. Sally Goza, attends a meeting at the White House with President Trump, students, teachers and administrators about how to safely reopen schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Top Pediatrician Says States Shouldn't Force Schools To Reopen If Virus Is Surging

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Dr. Michael Drake was named the President of the University of California system on Tuesday. He takes over a sprawling system that includes 10 campuses and more than 280,000 students. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Simge Topaloğlu, a Turkish citizen pursuing her doctorate at Harvard University, was caught off-guard by a new international student visa regulation put forward by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement earlier this week. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

A statue of John Harvard, namesake of the university, overlooks the campus earlier this year. Harvard University joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in suing the federal government over its policies on international students Wednesday. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Wednesday's decision seems to be an extension of a 2012 ruling in which the Supreme Court unanimously found that a fourth-grade teacher at a Lutheran school who was commissioned as a minister could not sue over her firing. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Justices Rule Teachers At Religious Schools Aren't Protected By Fair Employment Laws

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Florida To Reopen Schools For Fall Semester Despite Coronavirus Crisis

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Interested Parties Watch To See If U.S. Schools Reopen For Fall Semester

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