Folk NPR Music stories featuring folk music.

Folk

Pete Mancini's new album, Foothill Freeway, comes out May 4. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Pete Mancini, 'Sweethearts of The Rodeo'

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The Secret Sisters' new album, You Don't Own Me Anymore, comes out June 9. Abraham Rowe/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Abraham Rowe/Courtesy of the artist

The Secret Sisters, 'Tennessee River Runs Low'

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Laura Marling's new album is Semper Femina. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Laura Marling On The Notion Of The Female Muse

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Bob Dylan, who announced he would accept in person the Nobel Prize for Literature, was silent after it was announced he would receive the prize. Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images

Andrew Bird performs on this week's episode of Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Andrew Bird On Mountain Stage

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Rose Cousins' new album is Natural Conclusion. Vanessa Heins/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Vanessa Heins/Courtesy of the artist

Rose Cousins On World Cafe

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"Sometimes when I do receive a song, I do feel like I'm going to the place where that song was originating from," Valerie June says. Jacob Blickenstaff /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jacob Blickenstaff /Courtesy of the artist

When Valerie June Writes Music, It Begins With A Voice In Her Head

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