Folk NPR Music stories featuring folk music.

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Earl Scruggs onstage in 2007. Michael Buckner/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Buckner/Getty Images

Earl Scruggs: The 2003 Fresh Air Interview

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Merle Travis' rendition of the traditional ballad "Midnight Special" is one of the greatest gems from the Old Town School of Folk Music's treasure trove. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'Midnight Special' by Merle Travis

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Earl Scruggs shown during a show in Indio, Calif., on May 3, 2008. Michael Buckner/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Buckner/Getty Images

Bluegrass Legend Earl Scruggs Has Died

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Mallory Benedict/NPR

First Aid Kit: Tiny Desk Concert

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Alan Lomax (right) with musician Wade Ward during the Southern Journey recordings, 1959-1960. Shirley Collins/Courtesy of Alan Lomax Archive hide caption

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Shirley Collins/Courtesy of Alan Lomax Archive

Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online

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A veteran of punk bands, Dry the River's Peter Liddle (center) began playing acoustic guitar to keep quiet as a med student. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Dry The River: Songs Of Cardiac Anatomy

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A Church That Fits Our Needs is Lost In The Trees' second album, a tribute to the late mother of frontman Ari Picker (second from left). Annalee Harkins/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Annalee Harkins/Courtesy of the artist

Lost In The Trees: A Golden Memorial Of Orchestral Folk

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Julia Nunes' new, fan-funded album is titled Settle Down. Shervin Lainez hide caption

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Shervin Lainez

The Sweetback Sisters. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

The Sweetback Sisters On Mountain Stage

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A lovely chamber-folk song, Aspidistrafly's "Landscape With a Fairy" follows its own leaf-covered path. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Little Fable

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Anais Mitchell has a penchant for storied poetry and a deep reverence for the expressiveness of folk music. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Anaïs Mitchell On World Cafe

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Jim White is a man on the brink in "What Rocks Will Never Know," but his optimism doesn't shake easily. Jim White hide caption

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Jim White

What Rocks Will Never Know

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